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Todd Simpson
post Sep 26 2015, 08:55 PM
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The exact way comes down to each person but it's really very simple. Just do as you see the people you've mentioned, doing. Put the guitar in between your legs and adjust slightly until you find a comfy spot. The only "rule" is that the guitar not be on your right leg. Other than that it's really up to you how to adjust. Try to keep the neck slanted up is about the only real trick smile.gif Make sense?

P.S. join me in vid chat today starting now and I can show you more smile.gif 4pm est.

QUOTE (AyanG @ Sep 26 2015, 02:11 PM) *
John petrucci,Jeff loomis,Chris Broderick were some monsters I have seen blasting in this stye.What is the exact way to hold the guitar,can you please share?


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Sep 26 2015, 08:57 PM


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AyanG
post Sep 28 2015, 08:22 PM
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Hey Todd,

Can you elaborate a bit on palm muting or share a lesson on how to control the unwanted string noise?


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Ayan
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Todd Simpson
post Sep 28 2015, 11:31 PM
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Sure! smile.gif Palm muting is simply using the right edge of your palm to mute the strings. Place your right hand on the bridge of your guitar and don't let it ball up. Try to center your hand on the bridge. Also, folks use their left hand to mute the strings that their right hand sometimes can't get. Take a look at this GMC lesson specifically on Muting. Take special care to watch his RIGHT HAND and how he is muting the strings. This is a great lesson on palm muting btw.

It explains the ins and outs of palm muting.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Palm-Muting-Technique/

Here is a more advanced vid once you get the technique down.

Video #7 gives you a great video angle on his mute. Try to replicate what you see here.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/palm-m...workout-lesson/

Here is a video I did that talks about it as well. smile.gif



Let me know how it goes smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (AyanG @ Sep 28 2015, 03:22 PM) *
Hey Todd,

Can you elaborate a bit on palm muting or share a lesson on how to control the unwanted string noise?


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Sep 28 2015, 11:35 PM


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AyanG
post Sep 29 2015, 07:55 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 28 2015, 10:31 PM) *
Sure! smile.gif Palm muting is simply using the right edge of your palm to mute the strings. Place your right hand on the bridge of your guitar and don't let it ball up. Try to center your hand on the bridge. Also, folks use their left hand to mute the strings that their right hand sometimes can't get. Take a look at this GMC lesson specifically on Muting. Take special care to watch his RIGHT HAND and how he is muting the strings. This is a great lesson on palm muting btw.

It explains the ins and outs of palm muting.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Palm-Muting-Technique/

Here is a more advanced vid once you get the technique down.

Video #7 gives you a great video angle on his mute. Try to replicate what you see here.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/palm-m...workout-lesson/

Here is a video I did that talks about it as well. smile.gif



Let me know how it goes smile.gif

Todd


Thanks Todd....that was awsome.

For quite a few days I am using the classical position like u.Had a bit shoulder pain though,I think that was due unbalanced sitting initially.But it seems pretty fluid now to move over the fretboard till the end,that seemed a bit stringent in the side saddle(although players like Joe sat and Steve vai,do the magic in that way).


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Ayan
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Todd Simpson
post Sep 29 2015, 10:25 PM
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Egad!! Pain is bad when it comes to guitar. sad.gif Are you using a FOOT STOOL of some kind to prop your left foot up about 6 or 8 inches? You have to find the right level of elevation for your body. You can just stack books until it feels right. When you reach the right level, you should feel zero pain in your shoulder smile.gif

I'm glad it's feeling better though let me know about your footstool solution smile.gif I gotta say, it really can help to play in classical as it's closer to the standing playing position and more natural IMHO for the wrist/hand. However, some folks learn side saddle so they play side saddle and some folks do really well with it like BEN HIGGINS! But like many things in guitar, it comes down to the individual smile.gif


QUOTE (AyanG @ Sep 29 2015, 02:55 PM) *
Thanks Todd....that was awsome.

For quite a few days I am using the classical position like u.Had a bit shoulder pain though,I think that was due unbalanced sitting initially.But it seems pretty fluid now to move over the fretboard till the end,that seemed a bit stringent in the side saddle(although players like Joe sat and Steve vai,do the magic in that way).



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AyanG
post Sep 30 2015, 06:33 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 29 2015, 09:25 PM) *
Egad!! Pain is bad when it comes to guitar. sad.gif Are you using a FOOT STOOL of some kind to prop your left foot up about 6 or 8 inches? You have to find the right level of elevation for your body. You can just stack books until it feels right. When you reach the right level, you should feel zero pain in your shoulder smile.gif

I'm glad it's feeling better though let me know about your footstool solution smile.gif I gotta say, it really can help to play in classical as it's closer to the standing playing position and more natural IMHO for the wrist/hand. However, some folks learn side saddle so they play side saddle and some folks do really well with it like BEN HIGGINS! But like many things in guitar, it comes down to the individual smile.gif


Hi,

Yeah i have arranged a small bucket upside down and keeping my foot on that smile.gif ......it seems quite a workout to play in that posture,(for people like me i guess),who have the habit to slouch and play in the side saddle and now have to play with straight back,balanced body.I guess a day will come when I will be playing an Yngwie Malmsteen lick with bulging biceps and a narrow waist biggrin.gif


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Ayan
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Todd Simpson
post Oct 1 2015, 05:15 AM
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That'll work! smile.gif Try to sit a bit forward in your chair and keep your back a bit straight if possible smile.gif Good posture can prevent all kinds of problems. But yeah, if you are used to slouching side saddle, this will be a bit of a change smile.gif but your body will adapt!

Todd

QUOTE (AyanG @ Sep 30 2015, 01:33 PM) *
Hi,

Yeah i have arranged a small bucket upside down and keeping my foot on that smile.gif ......it seems quite a workout to play in that posture,(for people like me i guess),who have the habit to slouch and play in the side saddle and now have to play with straight back,balanced body.I guess a day will come when I will be playing an Yngwie Malmsteen lick with bulging biceps and a narrow waist biggrin.gif


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AyanG
post Oct 6 2015, 09:41 AM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Oct 1 2015, 04:15 AM) *
That'll work! smile.gif Try to sit a bit forward in your chair and keep your back a bit straight if possible smile.gif Good posture can prevent all kinds of problems. But yeah, if you are used to slouching side saddle, this will be a bit of a change smile.gif but your body will adapt!

Todd


Hi Sarge,

How are you?I just wanted to know while I am working on your lessons everyday,I also want to dig a bit inside the theoretical parts like scales,modes and arpeggios,triads etc.....so which will be the best source to check into that?(Btw....i have a question to ask like why does Andrew Cockburn and many others suggests to learn the pentatonics at first than the normal major and minor scales.....i mean the pentatonics are derived from the major and minors and so we should learn them at first and then the pentatonics??? tongue.gif )


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Ayan
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Todd Simpson
post Oct 6 2015, 11:23 PM
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Hey smile.gif I'd say ask to join Gabes Army as well as my bootcamp smile.gif he has a plethora of pre recorded lessons here on GMC that he can point you to. As for scales, I don't really think it matters that much which set you learn first, as long as you learn them smile.gif
The pentatonics are very handy as they can work as a solo construction over nearly anything. The first pentatonic and blues shape is pretty simple so I'd say learn that quickly smile.gif Once you have that, maybe learn the first position in two octaves major and minor. Bottom string to top string.

After that you can connect the shapes up and down the fretboard which just takes some practice. You can use the scale generator to see every note in any scale all the way up the neck smile.gif

Sarge


QUOTE (AyanG @ Oct 6 2015, 04:41 AM) *
Hi Sarge,

How are you?I just wanted to know while I am working on your lessons everyday,I also want to dig a bit inside the theoretical parts like scales,modes and arpeggios,triads etc.....so which will be the best source to check into that?(Btw....i have a question to ask like why does Andrew Cockburn and many others suggests to learn the pentatonics at first than the normal major and minor scales.....i mean the pentatonics are derived from the major and minors and so we should learn them at first and then the pentatonics??? tongue.gif )



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