Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Books On Musicianship
AyanG
post Sep 4 2015, 11:19 AM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 139
Joined: 14-May 15
From: India
Member No.: 20.976



Hi All,

I have always been a reader by heart and whatever work I do,I not only learn the technical side of it,but I also look out for books or blogs that come up with varied topics surrounding the lesson,esp.the philosophical side like how to build up the ethics,discipline and will to get into the state of Flow with the work.

The book that I am reading now is Zen Guitar.Although,I am not so much inclined spiritually,but in the light of rational thinking and analysing the essence of the lessons told in the book,its quite fascinating and generic for all fields of learning.Another book that I enjoyed reading was
"Geek to Guitar Hero" penned by Alex Skolnick , and I would suggest everyone to read it.

On my bucketlist,I have a book called "The Inner game of Music" , that is also a suggested read from John Petrucci in his interview on Guitar World.

I would love to know,from your side,about the books that have helped you in your musical journey.

Thanks.


--------------------
Thanks and regards,

Ayan
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post Sep 4 2015, 12:51 PM
Post #2


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.774
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



I'm currently reading Effortless Mastery by Kenny Werner, it was recommended by my brilliant mentor Gab.
Well worth a look.
smile.gif

This post has been edited by Phil66: Sep 4 2015, 12:52 PM


--------------------

GMC CERTIFICATE

“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
AyanG
post Sep 4 2015, 01:01 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 139
Joined: 14-May 15
From: India
Member No.: 20.976



QUOTE (Phil66 @ Sep 4 2015, 11:51 AM) *
I'm currently reading Effortless Mastery by Kenny Werner, it was recommended by my brilliant mentor Gab.
Well worth a look.
smile.gif


Wo!Thanks Phil for sharing.......


--------------------
Thanks and regards,

Ayan
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Sep 4 2015, 03:22 PM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 28.432
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



I was going to say what Phil said... biggrin.gif

Also check "The Music Lesson" by Victor Wooten.



--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Sep 4 2015, 04:49 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.743
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I too can recommend 'Effortless Mastery' and the 'Music Lesson'.

And just a general how to be effectively creative book ... 'The Artists Way' by Julia Cameron.
http://www.amazon.com/The-Artists-Way-Juli...n/dp/1585421464

Zen guitar and inner game of music were both adapted from existing books.
*Personally, I feel that the originals are way more instructive ...
Zen in the Art of Archery
Inner Game of Tennis


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post Sep 4 2015, 08:49 PM
Post #6


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.774
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



That's very interesting Ken, why do you feel the originals are better when they are about tennis and archery? I haven't read either but am thinking of buying so your input is appreciated smile.gif

Cheers

By the way, great question Ayan smile.gif


--------------------

GMC CERTIFICATE

“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Sep 4 2015, 09:19 PM
Post #7


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.743
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



IMO, the source is always best.
The subsequent authors will always 'edit' something that they feel isn't necessary or over explain something that shouldn't be over explained. Well, that's for me the reader to decide and also, it's VERY easy to adapt a tennis racket or a bow to a guitar.

Those two books are about archery and tennis in the same way Moby Dick is about a whale or the Knights of the Round Table is about a cup. They are on one level but ...

None of these books expose secrets or mysteries. There are none, just stuff one doesn't see. They show you a path to finding them on your own - and it's different for everybody.

Zen in the Art of Archery (1948), Inner Game of Tennis, the Artists Way, Zen and the Art of Motor Cycle Maintenance - these are all books that pre-date the self help and New Age movements. Because of that, they don't spoon feed you 'feel good' accolades and easy tactics that frankly most folks could figure out on their own if they would just sit down, take it easy and reflect for a minute ... or just practice what their teacher tells them. These books expect you to do some work and it's not always very obvious. The Kenny Werner book is also great in this regard.
Hermann Hesse's 'Siddartha' should be in that list too.

*I like the Zen Guitar book by the way but I dig it because of my experience with it's forerunners.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Sep 4 2015, 09:34 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post Sep 6 2015, 04:32 PM
Post #8


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.774
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



Thanks for explaining smile.gif


--------------------

GMC CERTIFICATE

“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post Sep 27 2015, 10:26 AM
Post #9


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.774
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



I'm currently reading The Practice of Practice by Jonathan Harnum and it is very very good. Possibly better than the Effortless Mastery book. It explains not only how to practice but also what happens within the brain when practising, I find these explanations even more encouraging because it makes you really realise that you need to slow down until you play with no mistakes because the brain does something to the neurons that reinforce what you practise and it doesn't know if you are practising with or without errors. I'm only 20% into the book but so far it is really good. It also explains about the differences in brain structure with different preconceptions about talent being genetically given or earned through practise and that state can be changed.
I recommend it for students at any level and instructors too. Everyone can learn from this book.


--------------------

GMC CERTIFICATE

“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Sep 27 2015, 04:33 PM
Post #10


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.743
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



That book sounds great Phil66.

Something my high school jazz band teacher taught me years ago is that if you practice too quickly and with mistakes, in order to play the passage correctly you have to first un-learn the mistake and then re-learn it correctly. It ends up taking three times as long.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Gabriel Leopardi
post Sep 27 2015, 05:16 PM
Post #11


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 28.432
Joined: 3-March 07
From: Argentina
Member No.: 1.289



QUOTE (klasaine @ Sep 27 2015, 12:33 PM) *
Something my high school jazz band teacher taught me years ago is that if you practice too quickly and with mistakes, in order to play the passage correctly you have to first un-learn the mistake and then re-learn it correctly. It ends up taking three times as long.



Wise words.


--------------------
My lessons

Do you need a Guitar Plan?
Join Gab's Army

Check my band:Cirse
Check my soundcloud:Soundcloud

Please subscribe to my:Youtube Channel
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Phil66
post Sep 27 2015, 05:31 PM
Post #12


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 3.774
Joined: 5-July 14
From: The Black Country, England
Member No.: 19.975



QUOTE (klasaine @ Sep 27 2015, 04:33 PM) *
That book sounds great Phil66.

Something my high school jazz band teacher taught me years ago is that if you practice too quickly and with mistakes, in order to play the passage correctly you have to first un-learn the mistake and then re-learn it correctly. It ends up taking three times as long.


It is great Ken,

I like books that explain stuff like that. There's a lot of science in it a and loads of links to science articles. He also interviewed many master musicians about how they practice and links top the full interviews are in there along with links to many of the other things he mentions.

smile.gif


--------------------

GMC CERTIFICATE

“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
yoncopin
post Sep 28 2015, 03:07 PM
Post #13


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 426
Joined: 26-September 09
From: USA
Member No.: 7.667



This is the best book I've found on practicing effectively. I read it a bit at a time and when I get to the end, just start back at the beginning. It keeps my focus on the little things needed to improve.

First, Learn to Practice


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 26th March 2017 - 04:39 AM