Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Advantages Of Running Two Eq's Back-to-back?
Chris S.
post Sep 13 2015, 10:19 PM
Post #1


Learning Apprentice Player
*

Group: Members
Posts: 810
Joined: 3-June 11
From: United States
Member No.: 12.988



Hey guys

I know that there are some guitar players that run two EQ's back to back (I think Kerry King is the only one I can remember off the top of my head) and I was wondering if there is actually an advantage to this?

I can understand running an EQ directly after your guitar, and then another in your FX loop - but it seems to me like two of the same EQ's in a row is just overkill - but then again I'm far from knowing what I'm talking about tongue.gif

It just seems like the second one would cancel out whatever the first one is doing, can you guys possibly enlighten me on how this would be useful?

Thanks cool.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mertay
post Sep 13 2015, 10:45 PM
Post #2


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 2.729
Joined: 27-May 13
From: Turkey / izmir
Member No.: 18.294



I'm not a fan of the idea using an eq between the guitar and amp.

It sort of sends the message that at least one of the equipment is simply wrong for the wanted tone and that eq is trying to fix it. Sure there can be situations, can't argue with that but I'll probably try searching the answer somewhere else if possible.

On the other hand, eq on fx loop can be very useful. Imagine it as an alternative to swapping speakers of the amp without the hassle. Amp eq's are designed to have musical results, they work around the tone usually with wide bands. An eq (let say specifically eq pedal) has a much more direct+narrow band approach, if you know the needed freq. change it will do it with no surprises.

Mesa amp's famous 5 band eq might be a nice example, notice its usually a V shape for modern tones. Also some people use upside down V shape at home, to compansate when they can't crack the amps volume. I use it on computer, when selecting the closest ir to my liking if there is time and need I don't hesitate to boost o cut some freq.s.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Sep 13 2015, 10:47 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Sep 14 2015, 06:42 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 14.458
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



I have to differ with Mertay on this as I require an EQ before nearly ever amp and amp emulation. Amps driven at high gain tend to "bunch up" in the bass frequencies, making the tone too muddy. Cutting a bit about 120 or 150 hz gets the tone much more "tight". Very few high gain amps can pull this off by themselves.

I use 2 EQs in nearly every Patch I make on my ELEVEN RACK. One before the preamp and one after the amp. That way I can control what's going in to the amp and then tweak the sound coming out. But to each his own smile.gif

Here is one such patch from my ELEVEN RACK.

Attached Image





QUOTE (Chris S. @ Sep 13 2015, 05:19 PM) *
Hey guys

I know that there are some guitar players that run two EQ's back to back (I think Kerry King is the only one I can remember off the top of my head) and I was wondering if there is actually an advantage to this?

I can understand running an EQ directly after your guitar, and then another in your FX loop - but it seems to me like two of the same EQ's in a row is just overkill - but then again I'm far from knowing what I'm talking about tongue.gif

It just seems like the second one would cancel out whatever the first one is doing, can you guys possibly enlighten me on how this would be useful?

Thanks cool.gif



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 24th May 2017 - 11:00 AM