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> Hone Your Tone - Episode #2, get some tips on how to improve your tone
petr
post Oct 25 2015, 11:35 PM
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Hi Darius,

so now after 3 years I connect the soundcard using the Blackstar emulated output instead of the speaker output smile.gif

Please can you check this recording
Attached File  voice201501025.mp3 ( 1013.06K ) Number of downloads: 37


guitar only
Attached File  voice201501025g.mp3 ( 996.33K ) Number of downloads: 47


Blackstar setting
Bass 1 oclock
Middle 1
Treble 2

No plugins in Cubase have been used yet

Please can you suggest what should be the next step?

Thanks Petr
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Darius Wave
post Oct 26 2015, 11:02 AM
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You are lucky nothing has happened to Your amp smile.gif Speaker out on the rear alwasy has to be connected to the speaker. Otherwise you might damage output transformer of your amp (especially tube amp).

I hope you don't mind me editting the post while any additional dieas come to my mind ? smile.gif


First impression of your tone is that it nice and warm. A little to warm for my taste but there is nothing wrong with itfrom technical point of view. I would probably add a little more treble and give a very little cut on the mids.

Next step is to "put your guitar in a room/place" so it won't be sounding like out of context. I saw you're using cubase right? Go to "Add track" option and add stereo "FX track"(remember to set it to stereo). Reverb works most efficient when it's set up on stereo FX track due to slightly different reflections timming in both channels. You won't hear that much difference as with stereo delay but you have to trust me it's really important (most easy to catch when you compare on headphones).Once the track appears in your session name it "reverb". Leave volume at 0 dB (simply do not change default volume level). Go to insert section and add the reverb of your choice. Cubase stock reverbs can do a lot of good job - no need to search for something else. Open reverb settings. Choose the reverb preset you like and then set mix to 100% wet. This track will be like 100% of pure reverb with no natural tone of guitar. At this point you will hear nothing because we will use this track as a "common reverb" for any additional guitar track in this session as well. No we need to "tell the guitar" to send some signal to reverb track. Click on your guitar track "send" section (work similar to inserts). Choose to send signal to track called "reverb" and set up how much of guitar will be sent through reverb (we will decide on how much reverb is in the mix by the level of send. Let me know if you have any problems with this. Next step we'll adjust the best reverb for your purpose and go to delay section

This post has been edited by Darius Wave: Oct 26 2015, 11:25 AM


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HiimAlex
post Oct 27 2015, 11:59 AM
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Hi Darius! smile.gif

This is a part of my composition that I am working on currently so it would be a pleasure to have great tone on this as well in the future smile.gif
Attached File  Hone_Your_Tone_Raw_Guitar.wav ( 12.11MB ) Number of downloads: 44

Attached File  Hone_Your_Tone_Guitar_with_Backing.wav ( 12.11MB ) Number of downloads: 56

My Setup is
Guitar to Digitech Gnx2
From headphone output of Digitech Gnx2 to PC soundcard

I use the amp simulation on the Gnx2.
Amp A: Marshall JCM 900 settings: Gain 99% Bass 37.5% Mid 46% Treble 46% Level 95%
Amp B: '65 Fender Twin Reverb setting: Gain 82% Bass37.5% Mid 46% Treble 54% Level 76%

I use a Noisegate and a Tube Screamer in Gnx2.
Settings of the Tube Screamer: Drive 0% Tone 46% Level 99%
I also had a reverb on several parts.
Reverb settings: Club Reverb. Predelay 20% Decay 22% Damping 40% Level 55%

This post has been edited by HiimAlex: Oct 27 2015, 12:02 PM
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Darius Wave
post Oct 27 2015, 09:43 PM
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Hey there! smile.gif

My first impression is - I really like you rhythm guitar tone. I would not change anything in it. It fill the space, keeps place for other instruments in the spectrum and creates pleasant wall of guitars in the background. Well done.

Now I think you should consider using other type of amp for solo tone. I suppose it's the Fender Twin sim for solo tone right? You know...Fender amps are one of totally best for cleans - twin reverb is on the first place here (at least by the popularity of use, I do not consider personal preferences here). But it's not a best choice for distortion unless you want just a slice of distortion caused mostyl by the poweramp due to high volume...but it's not the same through plug-ins. For lead tones Marshall could give you better bite while keeping smooth sustain with medium distortion.

As fro the reverb I would choose something more bright. It might not necessary sound best when listening to guitar standalone, but could be better to cut through the mix. at this moment your reverb does boost middle tones and gets lost in the mix so you actually do not create as much feeling of "being somewhere in the room or hall". I would suggest to try something more like hall than a room. At least not for such a dense mix with wall of guitars in the background smile.gif


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HiimAlex
post Oct 28 2015, 10:48 AM
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Hey Darius! smile.gif

Thank you very much for your feedback. I think I did not explain this good enough.

The rhythm guitar is in the backing track which I have taken from Youtube.
And I use both the Marshall and the Fender at the same time, so I blend these two amps together. Right now I use 76% of the Fender twin reverb and 24% of the Marshall. Maybe is it a good idea to use more of the Marshall and less of the Twin Reverb ?

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Darius Wave
post Oct 28 2015, 05:30 PM
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My general advice on this would be to assign yourself to one amp at the time. Blending amps, mics, cabinets can lead into total confusion an the poitn where you can no lonmger say what to touch to make things sound better. Even for experienced sound engeneer blending stuff delivers some trouble. When You blend different amps you get two different dynamics response at the same time and this is something quite different than making your tone sound fuller by mixing mics or cabs. Different dynamics resnpose will casue for example one amp giving you proper tone of pinch harmonic, while other totally fail to produce it. You can get quite huge confusion while playing smile.gif

I would go for trying to pull out a good tone just from the marshall simulation. I would use fender for a totally clean tones. Let's start from that point. Can you try it out and prepare a tone for reference? smile.gif


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HiimAlex
post Oct 28 2015, 10:20 PM
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That sounds great Darius smile.gif
Here is a reference tone of the Marshall simulation.
I turned down the gain and level to 60% and changed to reverb to Hall instead of Club otherwise the settings is the same as previous.Attached File  Hone_your_Tone_Raw_Guitar_2.wav ( 8.5MB ) Number of downloads: 37

Attached File  Hone_your_Tone_With_Backing.wav ( 8.5MB ) Number of downloads: 39
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Darius Wave
post Oct 30 2015, 01:59 PM
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Is that Marshall combined to a cabinet simulation or you can change cabinets as an independent section? I think I would go for brighter cabinet or put around 10% more treble on the am settings


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HiimAlex
post Oct 31 2015, 11:58 AM
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I can change cabinets independent. Right now I use a British 4x12. Here is a list of all the cabinets.
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Darius Wave
post Nov 2 2015, 01:43 PM
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Even though those names suggest something, It is still hard to guess remotely how each other would act. Woudl it be possible for you to make ma asample of each mode? Jus ta few notes...the same notes played on each of those cabinet options so I could advice which one in my opinion would work best smile.gif


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HiimAlex
post Nov 2 2015, 09:01 PM
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Thanks for your help Darius! smile.gif
Here is a short sample. I start with number 1 Direct (No cabinet) and take them in order and finish with number 13 Pro 1x15.
Attached File  Hone_your_Tone_Cabinet_Testing.wav ( 15.56MB ) Number of downloads: 42

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JohnMathew
post Nov 3 2015, 06:36 PM
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Hi guys,

Nice to have this thread around smile.gif.

I need some help with my tone. Well I think I need all the help in the world smile.gif. One of my first problems when I record is that the sound I get through the amp is not the same I get when I render my recorded track. I guess this is because of the different equalizations but don't know how to fix it. I would like to play through the amp and get same sound when I render the recorded track.

Is this possible? Could any one be so kind to help here with any steps or anything I need to achieve this?

After achieving this I think I will get into improving my overall tone that it is pretty ugly (isn't it Gab? biggrin.gif)

Cheers.
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Darius Wave
post Nov 4 2015, 05:09 PM
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HimAlex - being in your shoes I would choose Butique 4x12". Most of those cabinet have way too dark tone. It's almost like you put a blanket on your cabinet. I know it's popular to "run far away from harsh treble" but a little bit of it does god things to you tone - especially the translation of dynamics. If You want really mellow tone you can alwasy switch to neck position but in he bridge position there will always be a little bit of harshness. If you take it all away, you loose some crunchness form palm muted notes for example or some definition from alternate picking. Of course this cabinet is still not a perfect choice but we learn to get best what we can from what we have smile.gif

QUOTE (JohnMathew @ Nov 3 2015, 05:36 PM) *
Hi guys,

Nice to have this thread around smile.gif.

I need some help with my tone. Well I think I need all the help in the world smile.gif. One of my first problems when I record is that the sound I get through the amp is not the same I get when I render my recorded track. I guess this is because of the different equalizations but don't know how to fix it. I would like to play through the amp and get same sound when I render the recorded track.

Is this possible? Could any one be so kind to help here with any steps or anything I need to achieve this?

After achieving this I think I will get into improving my overall tone that it is pretty ugly (isn't it Gab? biggrin.gif)

Cheers.


Hey John!

First of all how do You record your amp? Microphone or line output with cabinet simulation?

Dynamics guitar micorphones are not transparent - the do have their own sound like any other part of signal chain. You can try to get closer to original amp tone when you cut frequencies that are boosted by the mic itself. For example wide cut -5dB on 5 kHz is a good startting point.

Another thing is...if you listen to your amp "from aobove" the cabinet then it's actually nothing close to what comes directly from the speaker (where you poitn the mic). Again...we can get close to this by using Low Pass Filter on recorded guitar track because what we experience being above the cab is nothing else like a "real life" low frequency passing or simply a loss of treble due tou our "to the source" position.

If You want to record exactly what you hear with a mic, then it has to be qute descent, linear response condenser mic placed at the spot and at the height where your ear is while listening to the "amp tone you like". Of course it will not happen due to huge room reflections captured with amplifier sound in your recording.

I suggest to start from placing your amp at your ears height and then setting up your amp's tone - with "the ear inb the speaker" relation. Then I we can skip to mic placement and eq.


Awaiting more details on how you record your amp and any kidn of sample would be great reference to strat searching for tweaks smile.gif

I


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JohnMathew
post Nov 4 2015, 11:24 PM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Nov 4 2015, 05:09 PM) *
HimAlex - being in your shoes I would choose Butique 4x12". Most of those cabinet have way too dark tone. It's almost like you put a blanket on your cabinet. I know it's popular to "run far away from harsh treble" but a little bit of it does god things to you tone - especially the translation of dynamics. If You want really mellow tone you can alwasy switch to neck position but in he bridge position there will always be a little bit of harshness. If you take it all away, you loose some crunchness form palm muted notes for example or some definition from alternate picking. Of course this cabinet is still not a perfect choice but we learn to get best what we can from what we have smile.gif



Hey John!

First of all how do You record your amp? Microphone or line output with cabinet simulation?

Dynamics guitar micorphones are not transparent - the do have their own sound like any other part of signal chain. You can try to get closer to original amp tone when you cut frequencies that are boosted by the mic itself. For example wide cut -5dB on 5 kHz is a good startting point.

Another thing is...if you listen to your amp "from aobove" the cabinet then it's actually nothing close to what comes directly from the speaker (where you poitn the mic). Again...we can get close to this by using Low Pass Filter on recorded guitar track because what we experience being above the cab is nothing else like a "real life" low frequency passing or simply a loss of treble due tou our "to the source" position.

If You want to record exactly what you hear with a mic, then it has to be qute descent, linear response condenser mic placed at the spot and at the height where your ear is while listening to the "amp tone you like". Of course it will not happen due to huge room reflections captured with amplifier sound in your recording.

I suggest to start from placing your amp at your ears height and then setting up your amp's tone - with "the ear inb the speaker" relation. Then I we can skip to mic placement and eq.


Awaiting more details on how you record your amp and any kidn of sample would be great reference to strat searching for tweaks smile.gif

I


Hi again,

Thanks a lot for the insights. I must say first that I'm a newbie on all this stuff so, please be patient smile.gif.

I have a focus rite 2i4 interface. I record my guitar through this interface using amplitude as my FX station. I use Reaper as my DAW.

I use one of the focusrite output to send the signal to my Marshal valvestate 100.

The problem is that the sound I heard from the cabinet (I have learnt a new techy term smile.gif ) does not feels/tastes/sounds the same that the sound I get when I render the track and plays through the PC speakers.

I have record something and play it through the cabinet again I get same sound. But As I pointed in my first post I guess it is because of the different EQ's, but not sure.

Ideally, it would be great if I could get same sound when playing trough the PC than playing through the cabinet.

Anyway, I don't know if I'm saying dumb things here :/. Don't really know how people really records guitar to get a good sound.

Cheers.

This post has been edited by JohnMathew: Nov 4 2015, 11:25 PM
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Darius Wave
post Nov 5 2015, 08:50 AM
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Now we know what we speak about smile.gif


Huge mistake spotted...
Never connect your guitar amp as a monitor for audio interface output. Guitar amps (especially speakers in amps dedicated to electric guitars) have totally different frequency response than a speakers for playing music/recordings. The idea of guitar speaker is to cut some of highest frequencies to make distorted channel sound tolerably. Othwerwise we would hear tons of "fizzy" frequencies that will hurt our ears.

When you playback your music thourgh an amp it's like playing a recording through a filter that takes away part of the spectrum (frequencies) and that's what we do not want to happen. We only want to have our guitar lost some treble, not the drums, vocals, cymbals or whatever you have in your mix.

For many years sound engeneers are struggling on how to record guitars to make them sound "like through the amp" while you playback your record on a regular home audio. Unfortunately here a huge worldwide compromise starts - same as guiitar amps, home audio speakers do sound different. Biggest difference (especially when you compare cheap speakrs with descent studio monitors) is the midrange. Cheap speakers will usually have much less middle frequencies - sort of "DJs would like it" cause it's mostly bass and treble. This mid scoop is an exactopposite of what guitar amp does - cutting some lows and highs. It's easy to make a conclusion - cheap speakers do not do the justice to guitar tones in recordings. You migh notice that professional music productions sound scooped (midrange cut) at the source. Removing some of the mids will make the diference between speakers less uncomfortable/less visible/less annoying.

First is to realize things above.

Next is to change the approach to adjusting guitar tone in recording. You don't want to have beautifull sounding guitar only on your home audio. You want to make your guitar sound reasonably good on all possible type os speakers...and that's the compromise I've mentioned before. So....do not try to make it sound exaclty like from the amp. Try to make it sound good on whatever audio gear you have at home.

Many of people I know (playing guitar of course) limit their audio expenses to gear that could be called high quality but...only when we consider home audio range, yet it is still nothing close to what we expect from gear for recording and mixing. Most of this gear has a lack of middle frequencies. A lot of people are pushing the mids (setting up the guitar tone) way above the limit they should not cross. That's because they try to make inexpensive PC speakers or headphones sound like guitar amp. A lot of my friends do this and I enjoy (not being mean) to watch their faces when I invite them to listen to thier sound in my home studio. It's usually so full of middle that it sounds like honky-tonk smile.gif Listening to a professional audio productions does not deliver such a terrifying difference between different audio gear.

You need to accept all of this before you start working with your own tone.

First...know how your PC speakers sounds. Listen to commercial, famous bands (they usually do afford world's best sound engeneers and studios...of course there are exceptions). Try to spot how those guitars sound in the mix on your speakers. Find your most favorite tone form poipular recording. Try to make it your reference. Compare what you record to what you hear in your refeence audio but unless you have descent studio monitors, do not try to make your recorded guitar sound exactly like what you get from the amp. There's a huge risk that only you will enjoy what you hear.

Let me know is there anything that needs additional explanation before we'll go further with particular tone set-up for you smile.gif





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JohnMathew
post Nov 5 2015, 10:25 AM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Nov 5 2015, 08:50 AM) *
Now we know what we speak about smile.gif


Huge mistake spotted...
Never connect your guitar amp as a monitor for audio interface output. Guitar amps (especially speakers in amps dedicated to electric guitars) have totally different frequency response than a speakers for playing music/recordings. The idea of guitar speaker is to cut some of highest frequencies to make distorted channel sound tolerably. Othwerwise we would hear tons of "fizzy" frequencies that will hurt our ears.

When you playback your music thourgh an amp it's like playing a recording through a filter that takes away part of the spectrum (frequencies) and that's what we do not want to happen. We only want to have our guitar lost some treble, not the drums, vocals, cymbals or whatever you have in your mix.

For many years sound engeneers are struggling on how to record guitars to make them sound "like through the amp" while you playback your record on a regular home audio. Unfortunately here a huge worldwide compromise starts - same as guiitar amps, home audio speakers do sound different. Biggest difference (especially when you compare cheap speakrs with descent studio monitors) is the midrange. Cheap speakers will usually have much less middle frequencies - sort of "DJs would like it" cause it's mostly bass and treble. This mid scoop is an exactopposite of what guitar amp does - cutting some lows and highs. It's easy to make a conclusion - cheap speakers do not do the justice to guitar tones in recordings. You migh notice that professional music productions sound scooped (midrange cut) at the source. Removing some of the mids will make the diference between speakers less uncomfortable/less visible/less annoying.

First is to realize things above.

Next is to change the approach to adjusting guitar tone in recording. You don't want to have beautifull sounding guitar only on your home audio. You want to make your guitar sound reasonably good on all possible type os speakers...and that's the compromise I've mentioned before. So....do not try to make it sound exaclty like from the amp. Try to make it sound good on whatever audio gear you have at home.

Many of people I know (playing guitar of course) limit their audio expenses to gear that could be called high quality but...only when we consider home audio range, yet it is still nothing close to what we expect from gear for recording and mixing. Most of this gear has a lack of middle frequencies. A lot of people are pushing the mids (setting up the guitar tone) way above the limit they should not cross. That's because they try to make inexpensive PC speakers or headphones sound like guitar amp. A lot of my friends do this and I enjoy (not being mean) to watch their faces when I invite them to listen to thier sound in my home studio. It's usually so full of middle that it sounds like honky-tonk smile.gif Listening to a professional audio productions does not deliver such a terrifying difference between different audio gear.

You need to accept all of this before you start working with your own tone.

First...know how your PC speakers sounds. Listen to commercial, famous bands (they usually do afford world's best sound engeneers and studios...of course there are exceptions). Try to spot how those guitars sound in the mix on your speakers. Find your most favorite tone form poipular recording. Try to make it your reference. Compare what you record to what you hear in your refeence audio but unless you have descent studio monitors, do not try to make your recorded guitar sound exactly like what you get from the amp. There's a huge risk that only you will enjoy what you hear.

Let me know is there anything that needs additional explanation before we'll go further with particular tone set-up for you smile.gif


Hi,

Great explanation!. I know understand why I was failing miserably biggrin.gif. From your text, it seems my cabinet is giving me almost only midrange frequency and my pc monitors the opposite. How the hell were both sounds going to be the same!

On the other hand, I understand that I don't want to sound good only at home but sound good in every place despite the sound won't be exactly the same.

My PC monitors are really cheap smile.gif. They are 2 creative ones with a subwoofer that I think they cost 60$ biggrin.gif.

So, we can move on, I'm really excited.

Again, Thanks a lot for the detailed information.

Cheers.
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Darius Wave
post Nov 7 2015, 03:06 PM
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Great! Then we can go further,

Now it's time for choice

1. Recording Your amp with microphone

2. Creating your whole tone chain using only plug-ins


In first case you'll need descent dynamic microphone - sm57 is good choice before you'll buy anything else, compare and choose your favorite mic for recording guitars. Your audio interface should be enough to amplify the microphone and you should be able to get descent tone using very simple eq-ing.

Advantages - no latency since you'll play through the amp directly. Less processing for your PC = less load on your CPU

Disadvantages - quite high amp volume needed to get best tone and avoid noises from your room - for example string noise form your electric guitar. Usually works fine if you live in you own house and have a spedcial place separated for your playing/recording
. Unfortunately it's hard to get the same tone everytime you'll come back to recording. Moving the mic 1 inch left/right/top/bottom will visibly change the tone. Also.. grill cloth of your cabinet works as a low pass filter. It will cut some trble the lower the volume is. But...If you are able to keep your mic placement and amp settings the same all the time, then you don't have to worry about it.


2. Plug-ins

Advantages - alwasy able to totally chnage the tone. Always the same tone no matter if you work at night on headphones or at the daytime on your pc speakers. Less noise due to less devices (cables, mic, preamps etc) in your signal chain (just plug directly to your interface). Tons of plug-ins constantly improving quality - many of those avalable for free (such as Poulin, TSE, Nicki Crow...). You can get back to your recording from yeras back and mix them much better once you'll have more experience at this field.


Disadvantages - unfortunately...latency. If you are able to get 2-10 ms latency then you can get used to it and record through "monitor" option on your track. You will then hear your guitar just like playing thourgh a regular amp. The problem is ...latency thing is a bit like a bermuda triangle mistery smile.gif There are no hard rules on how to properly set your PC to work with lowest possible latency. There are only some tips that should help, but....there is no guarantee at all. It's more a matter of luck...or...having Standard PC workstation with firewire card and firewire interface. Thos were by far the most stable ones giving best latency reduction even of quite poor CPU. Unfortunately...most laptops do not have firewire port.


In 2nd case there is also a sulution to latency issue if you fail to get id done in your PC settings.
You can buy a Di-box and send your signal to both - interface and real amp at the same time. Interface will record only dry "line out" signal from your guitar, while your amp will work like a monitoring device. You could attach plug-ins and their setting later, in the mix.


Let me know what is your choice smile.gif


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krakou
post Nov 7 2015, 09:47 PM
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Hello Darius,

As you kindly propose it, let's talk about and try to improve my tone(s).

First, I have to admit I don't really understand what you write about frequencies..
I know it is hard to believe, but I don't really know what my sound is made from.
I'm quite lost with all possible tweaks, settings,.. so most of the times I just put an amp, than a booster, than a delay then a reverb and tweak all buttons until I'm more or less satisfied with what I have.
Yeah, I'm a miserable :-)

Two years ago, I used to have a tone that I liked quite a lot, it was this one:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsCaIEsk9MY (once again, sorry for the video..)
But is was with a Charvel with Evolution & ToneZone DiMarzios and a line6 patch.

Now the Charvel is sold(big mistake) and I have my Strat ri62 (single coils 57-62) plugged through Komplete audio>Reaper>Guitar rig 5.

I've found a parametric equalizer and set -6 db a 5130 Hz.

I've added a picture of my stack and a new take on the lesson (I've deleted the take of the REC exercice).
It sounds a little bit too harsh for my ears, I'd like more warmth but ok, I'm ready to learn :-))

Bye and thanks again !!

JL

This post has been edited by krakou: Nov 7 2015, 09:48 PM
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JohnMathew
post Nov 8 2015, 01:07 PM
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QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Nov 7 2015, 03:06 PM) *
Great! Then we can go further,

Now it's time for choice

1. Recording Your amp with microphone

2. Creating your whole tone chain using only plug-ins


In first case you'll need descent dynamic microphone - sm57 is good choice before you'll buy anything else, compare and choose your favorite mic for recording guitars. Your audio interface should be enough to amplify the microphone and you should be able to get descent tone using very simple eq-ing.

Advantages - no latency since you'll play through the amp directly. Less processing for your PC = less load on your CPU

Disadvantages - quite high amp volume needed to get best tone and avoid noises from your room - for example string noise form your electric guitar. Usually works fine if you live in you own house and have a spedcial place separated for your playing/recording
. Unfortunately it's hard to get the same tone everytime you'll come back to recording. Moving the mic 1 inch left/right/top/bottom will visibly change the tone. Also.. grill cloth of your cabinet works as a low pass filter. It will cut some trble the lower the volume is. But...If you are able to keep your mic placement and amp settings the same all the time, then you don't have to worry about it.


2. Plug-ins

Advantages - alwasy able to totally chnage the tone. Always the same tone no matter if you work at night on headphones or at the daytime on your pc speakers. Less noise due to less devices (cables, mic, preamps etc) in your signal chain (just plug directly to your interface). Tons of plug-ins constantly improving quality - many of those avalable for free (such as Poulin, TSE, Nicki Crow...). You can get back to your recording from yeras back and mix them much better once you'll have more experience at this field.


Disadvantages - unfortunately...latency. If you are able to get 2-10 ms latency then you can get used to it and record through "monitor" option on your track. You will then hear your guitar just like playing thourgh a regular amp. The problem is ...latency thing is a bit like a bermuda triangle mistery smile.gif There are no hard rules on how to properly set your PC to work with lowest possible latency. There are only some tips that should help, but....there is no guarantee at all. It's more a matter of luck...or...having Standard PC workstation with firewire card and firewire interface. Thos were by far the most stable ones giving best latency reduction even of quite poor CPU. Unfortunately...most laptops do not have firewire port.


In 2nd case there is also a sulution to latency issue if you fail to get id done in your PC settings.
You can buy a Di-box and send your signal to both - interface and real amp at the same time. Interface will record only dry "line out" signal from your guitar, while your amp will work like a monitoring device. You could attach plug-ins and their setting later, in the mix.


Let me know what is your choice smile.gif

Hi!,

For me the decision is easy. Plugin time!. With my focusrite I can play realtime with a stack of several plugins without noticiable delay, so, I-m ok {Or I think so...}. I must say I have been using Lepou plugin with a screamer tube for Gab's Anvil lesson and my result tone is not the same. I can confirm plugins are stacked in the same orther in Renoise.

Well I have decided Darius... lets see what we can achieve. Im really excited.

Cheers.
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yoncopin
post Nov 8 2015, 02:35 PM
Post #40


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Hi Darius, this is really awesome of you and I wanted to get some feedback too. I have been working on Piotr's Winter Tune II and wanted to get some help with my rhythm and solo tones. They are my two main sounds and I use them in a lot of lessons. I get good feedback on them, but I still think they have lots of room to improve. The rhythm sound seems to get a bit muddy and the solo tone could use some more sustain, among other things.

Any tips would be awesome, here are my files:

Complete track Attached File  Winter_Tune_II.wav ( 40.31MB ) Number of downloads: 36

Rhythm Attached File  Rhythm.wav ( 6.38MB ) Number of downloads: 32

Solo Attached File  Solo.wav ( 26.46MB ) Number of downloads: 38


Pics of Pod HD500X Settings
Rhythm
Attached Image
Attached Image

Solo
Attached Image
Attached Image

This post has been edited by yoncopin: Nov 8 2015, 02:37 PM


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