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Frankster
post Oct 16 2015, 12:10 PM
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Hello!

My band is thinking about using online distribution like iTunes and Spotify and so on....

After searching Google I found some companies who will do the work for you.
They upload your songs on different online stores like iTunes, Amazon and also send the songs to Streaming Services like Deezer .....

Do you also use this kind of service or do you upload you songs directly on Amazon, iTunes .... ?

Whats your oppinion about these Services ?

I am from Austria so this links are from Germany wink.gif
http://www.feiyr.com/
http://www.dooload.de/
https://www.recordjet.com/
http://www.zimbalam.de/

We don´t do this to get rich or earn a lot of money. The idea behind this is to use the possibility of online services.
That we can say: "Look we are using deezer and you can buy our Music on iTunes ....... "

Many Thanks
Frankster
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Arpeggio
post Oct 16 2015, 10:29 PM
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Always go straight to the small print. In my view some of the most important parts are the termination conditions and what, if anything, survives termination of contract (if it goes pear shaped you want be parachuting with your shirt on and not taken off your back). Also the copyrights of course. Making sure that all they are asking for is the rights to distribute only, while you retain all copyrights. Good companies tend to have contracts that are made as simple to understand as possible (for a contract), unambiguous and not open to interpretation.

Just taking Feiyr as an example of how I would look at them all: Part 5.1 of the feiyr contract asks for exclusive, transferable and worldwide distribution rights to your work. I would only want to grant non-exclusive rights if they are only distributing my work into outlets, which it seems Feiyr are (and not marketing it). It lists many sales channels but as far as I can tell not a list of their clients (i.e. individual artists, small to medium publishers etc.) in other words people like yourself who use them. To me, that’s not good. I find it at odds with and quite in contrast to their large list of sales channels. I’d go for a company that does show who their current clients are and examine them further from there.

QUOTE (Frankster @ Oct 16 2015, 12:10 PM) *
We don´t do this to get rich or earn a lot of money. The idea behind this is to use the possibility of online services. That we can say: "Look we are using deezer and you can buy our Music on iTunes ....... "


You could just go straight to iTunes and Google Play. If most people will discover your music via you then larger distribution would have to justify itself by at least accounting for some people discovering you through those channels also.

This post has been edited by Arpeggio: Oct 16 2015, 10:30 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 17 2015, 05:28 AM
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Some very good points smile.gif If someone is going to do all the work for you, they are going to want something out of it of course. So as we mentioned, always read the fine print smile.gif However, if you are pressed for time with busy schedules, using one of these "do it all services" is often well worth it as the money generated from the entire endeavor will likely be somewhat tiny. But say you hit the lottery and have a HUGE musical success. You'll still get paid smile.gif Just perhaps not as much. However, I wouldn't focus on winning the musical lottery. I'd suggest focusing on the music.

If your music catches on, you will always have more options down the road smile.gif For now, I'd say come to a decision as a band and pick whichever service you seem to be able to get a positive read on from friends, the web, etc. If, on the other hand, you have all the time in the world, you can always go about trying to release everything yourselves on the various services. Either way, share what you end up doing so we here at GMC can support your band smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Arpeggio @ Oct 16 2015, 05:29 PM) *
Always go straight to the small print. In my view some of the most important parts are the termination conditions and what, if anything, survives termination of contract (if it goes pear shaped you want be parachuting with your shirt on and not taken off your back). Also the copyrights of course. Making sure that all they are asking for is the rights to distribute only, while you retain all copyrights. Good companies tend to have contracts that are made as simple to understand as possible (for a contract), unambiguous and not open to interpretation.

Just taking Feiyr as an example of how I would look at them all: Part 5.1 of the feiyr contract asks for exclusive, transferable and worldwide distribution rights to your work. I would only want to grant non-exclusive rights if they are only distributing my work into outlets, which it seems Feiyr are (and not marketing it). It lists many sales channels but as far as I can tell not a list of their clients (i.e. individual artists, small to medium publishers etc.) in other words people like yourself who use them. To me, that’s not good. I find it at odds with and quite in contrast to their large list of sales channels. I’d go for a company that does show who their current clients are and examine them further from there.



You could just go straight to iTunes and Google Play. If most people will discover your music via you then larger distribution would have to justify itself by at least accounting for some people discovering you through those channels also.



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Rammikin
post Oct 17 2015, 05:39 AM
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I use Cdbaby. Their fees are reasonable but the thing I like is they just charge a one-time fee, instead of an annual fee like some services charge to keep your album on iTunes and spotify.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Oct 17 2015, 04:29 PM
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I had good experiences with CDbaby and Tunecore. All my band's albums are published thought CDbaby nowadays and it work great.

As we are on topic, I was wondering, do you follow my band on Spotify? biggrin.gif

https://play.spotify.com/artist/4lXlGJYomLA...utm_medium=open


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Rammikin
post Oct 17 2015, 05:03 PM
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I do!


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