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> Reverb Addiction?, Let's talk reverb!
Todd Simpson
post Dec 19 2015, 12:50 AM
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Good question! P.S. feel free to shoot me a personal message here @ GMC as I may miss a given post pointed to me now ang again. But I see this one! smile.gif

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A reverb parameter common to most units is that of Reverb Decay Time, which is how long it takes for the reverb to drop by 60dB from its maximum level. Increasing this time increases the sense of size of your virtual room — think of the difference between a small stone church and a massive cathedral. However, an increased inside surface area in a room reduces the decay time, and this is one of the reasons why the presence of an audience 'dries out' the acoustic in a venue compared to that experienced at the soundcheck. Furthermore, the less enclosed a space is, the shorter its reverb decay time — an open field is much less reverberant than a barn.

More well-specified reverberators have additional High- and Low-frequency Damping parameters, which allow you to shorten the reverb decay for the frequency extremes. While simpler reverberators may not have independent control over these damping parameters, you are often given a choice of reverb models (for example 'Room', 'Hall' and 'Plate') which provide different preset damping combinations.

When little Low-frequency Damping is used, the simulated space seems more solidly built and sizeable — large caves, for example, have a characteristic rumble to their reverb, whereas most normal rooms have very short low-end reverb times. High-frequency Damping helps to simulate the absorbance of high-end by soft funishings, carpets, curtains and so forth — furnished rooms usually sound 'warmer' than those which are unfurnished. However, in very large acoustic spaces the reverb time at high frequencies is also reduced by the damping effects of the air itself, which are concentrated at high frequencies.

Another common parameter in reverb units is Pre-delay Time , which allows you to specify the amount of time between the start of the direct sound and the start of the first sonic reflection. Decreasing this time moves the sound source closer to the boundaries of your simulated room, but also moves it further from the listener — if you use reverb on an 'in-your-face' pop vocal you should not use too short a Pre-delay Time.

Even if you only adjust parameters for Direct/Effect Levels, Reverb Decay Times and Pre-delay, you have enough control to create a wide variety of useable reverb settings. A good way to find the one you need is first to decide on the type of environment within which you want your sounds to occur. Then, by considering the physical design of that imaginary space, and by applying what you know about the basic reverb parameters, you can often get pretty close to the ambience setting you're after straight away.

Here is a quick vid about reverb that talks about pre delay with visuals.



Hope this helps! smile.gif

Todd



QUOTE (ChrisGLP @ Dec 18 2015, 11:17 AM) *
Hi Todd... what are the Parameters "Decay" and "PRE Delay" at the reverb Settings?


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Dec 19 2015, 01:04 AM


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ChrisGLP
post Dec 19 2015, 07:40 AM
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Wow Todd... thx very much for this detailed answer... smile.gif

now I have understood for what these parameters are good for. I have learned so much since I am here at GMC....
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ChrisGLP
post Dec 19 2015, 08:09 AM
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Todd, because of your really good Explanation you should do a Video lesson where you explain the Settings of the most important effects with examples... biggrin.gif cool.gif
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Todd Simpson
post Dec 19 2015, 09:39 AM
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Happy to help! As for the video, Someone already beat me to it!! smile.gif



However, I have found that beyond watching vids and reading up on bits and such, that hands on experience has taught me the most about FX. You can get a good sample of nearly every type of effect available by downloading a demo of AMPLITUDE or GUITAR RIG or OVERLOUD TH3 and experimenting with settings. That's honestly how I learned the most about fx. But videos can be very helpful to be sure.



QUOTE (ChrisGLP @ Dec 19 2015, 03:09 AM) *
Todd, because of your really good Explanation you should do a Video lesson where you explain the Settings of the most important effects with examples... biggrin.gif cool.gif



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