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> Improving Legato
Chris S.
post Jan 3 2016, 02:46 PM
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Hello Mr. Dahl,

Watching your jams on Facebook, I really like the use of your legato - I'm finding myself liking the "fluid"tone of using fast legato licks/runs over the more aggressive strict picking runs.

Although the picking runs have their place, I want to focus heavily on my legato technique which is quite a ways behind when compared with my picking.

My biggest problem is trying to develop a solid plan/regime that can help build my legato chops - I feel a bit lost in that aspect.

How did you develop your legato into how great it is currently?

Thank you biggrin.gif


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 3 2016, 02:57 PM
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Thanks so much Chris!

My legato technique is still very much a work-in-progress, because I realise more than ever this is the #1 technique for total freedom in your improvised lines.

The old school way of practicing legato was to choose a bunch of patterns and then torture yourself with a metronome for MANY hours. This allows to build speed but it is useless for improvising. You will rather be practicing a circus trick.

The way I practice it today, is to find a slow backing track - and play legato really slowly. I never practice it faster than Ben plays in this lesson (NB no legato used here) : https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Becker-Made-Easy/

When practicing at this tempo I have the time to fond new ways/lickx around the fretboard, think of my tone, think of my muting technique etc

Now when I PLAY (meaning a jam away and try tog get into 'the zone') - I will attempt to do it at all sorts of speeds. I won't even be thinking in terms of 16th notes , triplets etc.

Does it make sense? What problems are you facing when playing/practicing legato?

I would suggest you pick a new backing track every day and play really slow legato lines. Go up 3 notes in the scale, skip a string, go down two notes, add some vibrato etc.


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Rhida
post Jan 3 2016, 06:50 PM
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And Rick Graham just posted this on his Youtube channel.



https://youtu.be/Tm06MtUPl8k
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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 3 2016, 08:46 PM
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QUOTE (Rhida @ Jan 3 2016, 07:50 PM) *
And Rick Graham just posted this on his Youtube channel.



https://youtu.be/Tm06MtUPl8k


Cool - that's a neat video. Rick sure knows what he is speaking about, and I love his tone.

However I do not practice legato this way with repetitive patterns, I try to practice it more freely as described above.

I think that if your practicing is repetitive, so will your playing be.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 3 2016, 09:36 PM
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..aand I should say welcome back Rhida! biggrin.gif


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Chris S.
post Jan 4 2016, 07:37 PM
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Hey Kris,

So combining your advice with Gabs advice I created this plan:

Instead of using a new backing every day I am going to do one backing track a week. Day one, record and improvisation over this backing track as a foundation.

I will then spend the next few days improving that improvisation, and learning new legato licks from lessons and solos that I like paying close attention to the licks and how that are structured.

Then at the end of the week post an update of my progress and compare to day one - see what is working and what instead and roll those concepts into the next week.

Yay or nay?

biggrin.gif

EDIT:

Decided to do my first take tongue.gif



This post has been edited by Chris S.: Jan 4 2016, 09:43 PM


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 4 2016, 11:01 PM
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Hey Chris - that video is really promising. Especially the slow part where you displayed control I have not seen from you before. Same goes for the vibrato at 00:28.

So this is what you should go for. Stay completely within this range, as it is many levels above your faster playing in terms of cleanliness, tone and vibrato.

So if you can try to forget/unlearn the technique you use in your faster passages - and completely stay within the slow range until that range grows. Then you will be able to take a BIG step up many levels.

Most people do however push speed because they're impatient to see results. However this does more damage than good.

---

Your routine sounds good and one new backing per week is fine as well! YAY! wink.gif


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Chris S.
post Jan 4 2016, 11:50 PM
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QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ Jan 4 2016, 10:01 PM) *
Hey Chris - that video is really promising. Especially the slow part where you displayed control I have not seen from you before. Same goes for the vibrato at 00:28.

So this is what you should go for. Stay completely within this range, as it is many levels above your faster playing in terms of cleanliness, tone and vibrato.

So if you can try to forget/unlearn the technique you use in your faster passages - and completely stay within the slow range until that range grows. Then you will be able to take a BIG step up many levels.

Most people do however push speed because they're impatient to see results. However this does more damage than good.

---

Your routine sounds good and one new backing per week is fine as well! YAY! wink.gif

Don't push for speed - keep it slow and focus on the note choices/structure? Got it biggrin.gif

I'll post an update at the end of the week of some different variations I've come up with.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Jan 5 2016, 04:12 PM
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QUOTE (Chris S. @ Jan 5 2016, 12:50 AM) *
Don't push for speed - keep it slow and focus on the note choices/structure? Got it biggrin.gif

I'll post an update at the end of the week of some different variations I've come up with.


Cool, I'm looking forward to it!


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