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> Does Learning New Songs Count As ''practice''?
ChocolateThunda
post Feb 10 2016, 03:18 PM
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So I really wanted to get better at guitar in 2016, but I find it REALLY hard to stick to a practice schedule.

I could learn two different techniques but never learn how to apply them together if that makes sense. So I was wondering, if I was learning a new song which has multiple techniques in it, could that be considered therefore learning that technique?

I was learning Overture 1928 and Summer Song for a while, and I felt guilty because thats ALL I did. But recently I've been thinking about just giving up on a practice schedule that I don't stick to and learn my favourite songs instead.

I'm pretty good, when learning songs, at thinking about what is going on in the song, not just blinding look at tabs etc, but I wanted to get your opinions on that.

Thinking about that while writing this, I guess this kinda reflects myself as a person! I never went to university and went straight into a job etc, guess I'm more ''doing'' than reading books etc tongue.gif
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klasaine
post Feb 10 2016, 03:37 PM
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If you're actually learning new techniques that you learn well and not sloppy, I would say yes.
It especially counts if you're doing it by ear. No tab, no video lesson. Just your ears.


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Todd Simpson
post Feb 10 2016, 04:09 PM
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I agree all the way smile.gif Learning by ear is a great way to train your ear and it's not easy at first. You can have the tablature on hand for when you get really stuck if you like smile.gif The more you learn by ear the easier it gets. Also don't stop tweaking till you can play the guitar part by itself, without the track playing and have it sound nice. Sometimes playing with the track can hide ones mistakes.

Todd

QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 10 2016, 09:37 AM) *
If you're actually learning new techniques that you learn well and not sloppy, I would say yes.
It especially counts if you're doing it by ear. No tab, no video lesson. Just your ears.



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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 10 2016, 04:45 PM
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Interesting post!

The idea of practicing is to be able to achieve our goals as guitarists and musicians. Focusing on musical stuff (it can be songs but I also consider many GMC lessons as mini (analyzed) songs) is totally effective and it's a very good way to keep motivation. It it's even better If you can learn the songs by ear and analyze them by yourself.

In my case, I like working on technique exercises when I identify a limitation that doesn't let me play a song that I want to play or something that I composed. So practicing exercises can be a good complement to be able to master the songs in a shorter period of time.

Once you learn a lick, solo, song or gmc musical lesson, creating your own variations can be a first step to get into composition.




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ChocolateThunda
post Feb 10 2016, 06:02 PM
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I love using GMC for practicing new techniques that I find in songs that I find hard.

I struggle with sweep picking so I'm working on a few lessons from the site, but ultimately I want to be able to incorporate them!

Thanks for the replies, a lot to take into account!
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 10 2016, 06:27 PM
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QUOTE (ChocolateThunda @ Feb 10 2016, 02:02 PM) *
I love using GMC for practicing new techniques that I find in songs that I find hard.

I struggle with sweep picking so I'm working on a few lessons from the site, but ultimately I want to be able to incorporate them!

Thanks for the replies, a lot to take into account!



This lesson includes VERY valuable info about how to incorporate lessons and licks learnt into your playing.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Your-First-Phrases/


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Darius Wave
post Feb 11 2016, 12:07 AM
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Playing and learning songs is a kind of practise as well. It improves your abilitiy to understand music and quickly respond to most common harmonic content. Hard to describe but it simply makes playign with other people simpler at some point. It's a skill itself even if you feel you do not give a justice to your fingers practise routine smile.gif


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Blister
post Feb 11 2016, 05:25 AM
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QUOTE (ChocolateThunda @ Feb 10 2016, 09:18 AM) *
So I really wanted to get better at guitar in 2016, but I find it REALLY hard to stick to a practice schedule.
...


I will beg your forgiveness while I play the Devil's Advocate. And I am certainly being a hypocrite here on what I'm about to say but you asked & this is my opinion. I will say "Yes, but...". I searched but couldn't find a forum post that fit my thought. Somewhere in this forum is a post talking about practicing in thirds. Meaning whatever time you are willing to devote to practicing you need to divide into three time segments. For example, let's say you are going to devote 1 hour per day to practice. ALWAYS start with stretching (thanks Todd!), first 20 minutes (technique) devote to scales and/or modes, next 20 minutes (goal) devote to learning a lesson for REC or the song as you mentioned in your post & last 20 minutes (fun) for jamming to a backing track. The reason for this is you need be keeping your techniques in your brain & fingers. You know, the old "use it or lose it". The second is for reaching a goal whether it's a lesson or a song but something you need to accomplish. And finally you need to do whatever it is that keeps you interested/motivated to play guitar which means you need to do something that is fun otherwise you may tire of playing & just give up. The times don't have to be strict but close. The specific examples above can be substituted for what you need to accomplish but should still stick to the "third" concept. Technique, Goal & FUN!

Of course, I'm just playing a "bad guy" here & you will definitely still progress your skills by just working on the song(s) you mentioned.

I know the instructors could explain this a lot better than me but that first sentence in your post caught my attention.

Again, I have no intention of being mean, I just wanted to add another perspective. smile.gif


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nikeman64
post Feb 15 2016, 02:53 PM
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Great topic !

What do we eventually do with all the great licks we study? First of all GMC lessons are perfect for studying : you have a perfect example, get info and have a backing track at different tempos! I always study with reference material (backing track or drum track)
Studying new licks or techniques, as part of a song you want to learn is (to my humble opinion) also great!! It motivates you to be able to play the stuff you're hero(s) do! Many great guitar Gods have learned this way from others. As mentioned you can find helpfull lessons on GMC to nail down a certain technique which is part of the song you want to learn, but have difficulties with.
But when you know the licks and can play them, you need to do something with it, otherwise you will loose (forget) them after a while. Write them down and get backing jam tracks (or record them yourself), lay the licks in front of you , transpose them if you need to, and start jamming, just play over a track and try to incorporate them in your playing. If you have the possibility : record yourself on vid. After a while you will feel/see what works better than other parts. I believe, this way, the licks will become more part of yourself, instead of playing something, somebody else did.
I remember, when I studied at Rock School in Antwerp there was this kid, who had amazing technique and speed but when we got to improvisation lessons, he was doing incredible things, but...., without telling a story.
I think we need to try to be musicians, not robots.

Nico smile.gif


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