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> Reverb Placing In The Signal Path
KenA
post Feb 21 2016, 01:52 PM
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Hi all,

I'm using software reverb in the daw using a path like this: guitar > audio interface > amp sim > reverb > cab sim > output

By mistake I've found out that if I put the reverb after the cab sim it actually works quite well. But how wrong it could be?

Do you think it's ok to use the principle of: if it sounds good, it's ok?
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GeneT95
post Feb 21 2016, 03:07 PM
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Definitely. Experimentation that sounds good or creates something interesting is what makes using a computer to make music so much fun.

Honestly, There is no real wrong in creating. Somethings may not sounds as pleasant or melt with the other parts, but its still creating. You can find some cool and interesting things by fooling around with a signal chain. Some of those may not be usable in certain styles of music, or at all, but in others you may find something else entirely.

I've done this with physical amps and cabs. Messing with the signal chain. It just takes longer to flip connections and reroute the signal then when using a computer DAW where you can do it so quickly and mess with the parameters on the fly.

And there are some things that you can try on a computer, like having reverb after the cab, that are not really feasible or simple in real life.

This post has been edited by GeneT95: Feb 21 2016, 03:10 PM
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Phil66
post Feb 21 2016, 03:12 PM
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I guess there are people that will say you should put it in a certain place in the chain but there aren't really any rules so long as you get the sound you yourself like.
Sometimes when people haven't got a clue what should go where and they just experiment they get awesome sound. Sometimes too much knowledge can be a hindrance because the theory gets in the way of creativity wink.gif
Sometimes people have forgotten to turn off the speasker sim before going into an actual amp and couldn't believe the sound they got wink.gif
I'd say if you like it go for it.smile.gif


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KenA
post Feb 21 2016, 04:30 PM
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Thanks guys,

That's what I suspect. If it's good, then it is.

You all mentioned a very interesting fact, it's all part of the creation process. As a musician/guitarrist we tend to think in separated tasks like: now I'm going to create some music with my guitar, then now I'm going to record it, add fxs, etc. But as a home recording project we actually don't go to a studio where a sound engineer will do it for you, that's part of your task too and although some parts/tasks are more tech oriented, the final product is a piece of art so everything counts in the whole creation process.

And of course, even if we were still living in the old age, the sum of all the steps are all part of the creation process.
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klasaine
post Feb 21 2016, 05:45 PM
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When you record with an amp in a studio, many times the reverb will be from the studios collection of either outboard gear, plug-ins or an actual reverb chamber or plate. Those will always be post cab, mic and preamp. In fact, other than surf and some rockabilly, that's the way it's done.

*A cool alternate trick is to place a chorus, phaser, flanger or (upper) octaver after the reverb. It gives a great modulated sound to the reverb as well as the tail of your notes and chords. This technique is actually quite common.

I would experiment with different placements, especially since it's so easy to do within a DAW. There is no wrong.


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KenA
post Feb 21 2016, 05:59 PM
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Hey klasaine, thanks for the tips ... I'll see what I can get with experimenting based on your advice ... I have no experience in real studio environment, so it's always nice to hear from someone who's actually been there! :-)

Another very interesting fact I'm learning with amp/cab sims is that 1 particular amp can sound very different according to the cab (or combinations of) you use, plus the type of mic (or combinations of) ... I believe few people can actually plug several cabs and mics to finally decide which one (s) are best for the amp you have or the kind of sound you want to achieve ... and let's not forget that your 'hands' are part of the problem too.

This post has been edited by KenA: Feb 21 2016, 06:00 PM
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Rammikin
post Feb 21 2016, 06:42 PM
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There is no "wrong" of course, but one thing to watch out for: cab sims are often mono. So, putting a cab sim like that after your reverb would undo the stereo imaging the reverb added to your sound. That's why you usually see the reverb after the cab sim.


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KenA
post Feb 21 2016, 06:53 PM
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Agreed Rammikin, I haven't thought about that! Thanks.
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klasaine
post Feb 21 2016, 06:56 PM
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QUOTE (KenA @ Feb 21 2016, 08:59 AM) *
Hey klasaine, thanks for the tips ... I'll see what I can get with experimenting based on your advice ... I have no experience in real studio environment, so it's always nice to hear from someone who's actually been there! :-)

Another very interesting fact I'm learning with amp/cab sims is that 1 particular amp can sound very different according to the cab (or combinations of) you use, plus the type of mic (or combinations of) ... I believe few people can actually plug several cabs and mics to finally decide which one (s) are best for the amp you have or the kind of sound you want to achieve ... and let's not forget that your 'hands' are part of the problem too.


Speakers, cabinets and mics make a H U G E impact on the final tone. It can't be understated.
I have several heads and several speaker cabinets and I'm still surprised at how different one head will sound through various cabinets. Tone, volume, Space.


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