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> Observation On Fast Scale Runs
Mertay
post Mar 27 2016, 05:02 PM
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I don't recommend testing it for everybody if they don't know bridge setuping though discussion is always welcome.

So I've played a guitar with a floyd type bridge for a really long time, such bridges radius isn't easy to change though do-able. Radius is the curve of the saddles;



While testing guitars recently, a vintage type bridged guitars saddles were set wrong (too flat). Whats interesting was I noticed picking was easier on it specially with the lower strings. As seen in the pickture adjusting radius with these types of bridges are very easy;



I actually bought that guitar and the bridge got setuped properly. Came home and noticed it wasn't as easy to pick now, thats how I got to this idea. I think for me, when doing fast runs string height differences really bothers me as I hit with different places of the pick and this can cause strength balance issues. I'm sceptic that even the best players follows such radius perfectly for every guitar and in time we simply get used to this fault and move on.

Thing is I couldn't find that tiny allen, seems I lost it and can't try this now sad.gif I will though on tuesday. Will decrease the 4 middle strings or heighten the corner strings...

For those who want to try, beware if set flat specially the low and high E strings will be higher than the other strings as every guitars neck also has a radius. Just a thought, comments welcome...

This post has been edited by Mertay: Mar 27 2016, 05:17 PM


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Chris S.
post Mar 27 2016, 05:31 PM
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I picked up a set of under string radius gauges from Stew Mac to match the saddles to the curvature of the fretboard and I too find this to make instrument more playable.

And for LP style bridges, I use a radius block and sand and then polish the saddles to better match the fretboard.

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AK Rich
post Mar 27 2016, 05:58 PM
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QUOTE (Mertay @ Mar 27 2016, 07:02 AM) *
I don't recommend testing it for everybody if they don't know bridge setuping though discussion is always welcome.

So I've played a guitar with a floyd type bridge for a really long time, such bridges radius isn't easy to change though do-able. Radius is the curve of the saddles;



While testing guitars recently, a vintage type bridged guitars saddles were set wrong (too flat). Whats interesting was I noticed picking was easier on it specially with the lower strings. As seen in the pickture adjusting radius with these types of bridges are very easy;



I actually bought that guitar and the bridge got setuped properly. Came home and noticed it wasn't as easy to pick now, thats how I got to this idea. I think for me, when doing fast runs string height differences really bothers me as I hit with different places of the pick and this can cause strength balance issues. I'm sceptic that even the best players follows such radius perfectly for every guitar and in time we simply get used to this fault and move on.

Thing is I couldn't find that tiny allen, seems I lost it and can't try this now sad.gif I will though on tuesday. Will decrease the 4 middle strings or heighten the corner strings...

For those who want to try, beware if set flat specially the low and high E strings will be higher than the other strings as every guitars neck also has a radius. Just a thought, comments welcome...


I recently tried out a used guitar I was thinking about buying and it was set up flat like that.The strings did not follow the radius of the neck and were set completely flat across the neck. This was not at all acceptable to me because of the inconsistent string action that you mentioned. The low E and A and the B and high E strings had obviously higher string action than the D and G strings. I asked the guy (who is a drummer) who set it up and he told me a guitar player friend and band member had set it up for him and that he liked it that way.

Maybe it works for him but for me it was just terrible. It was hard for me to get a good smooth flow going on when trying out some faster legato runs on it and I kept missing pick strikes when going across the middle strings to the higher ones. String skipping wasn't working so great either.

Without playing a setup like that for any length of time, I can't really say if it would be better since I am used to a string setup that follows the radius of the neck, but my first impression was not good at all. I am so set in my ways that I think it would be a waste of time to try it for any length of time. I just don't think it would be beneficial to me at all. If it ain't broke, don't fix it. smile.gif
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Rammikin
post Mar 27 2016, 06:18 PM
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My experience is the same as AKRich. If they don't match it doesn't work well. But I also agree with mertay that flatter is better. So the answer for me is a large fretboard radius.


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PosterBoy
post Mar 28 2016, 08:36 AM
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Yhat is generally why 'shred' guitars have a flatter radius. I think it's why i find my Tyler easier for soloing as it has a 9.5 - 12 compound radius and my tele has a 9.5" all the way up.

I do rest my palm on the bridge when playing and this does help guide my pick in regards to the string height difference a bit.


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Mertay
post Mar 28 2016, 08:48 AM
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Thinking about it, probably its me being used to the ibanez and since the Jackson I got is more curved thats what bothers me.

The left hand is very comfortable, will be even more once I lower the nut. So I guess slight flattening the bridge saddles won't hurt, we'll see smile.gif

Edit; found an allen from the neighbour, flattened it but kept the bass E and A a tab higher and liked it more. Probably made it closer to compound radius Jacksons as I think they're adjusted according to the lowest fret anyway. Tomorrow I'll let the luthier do the detailed adjustment along with the nut lowering.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Mar 28 2016, 02:52 PM


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