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> Diy Studio Rack Dimensions
yoncopin
post Aug 15 2016, 03:04 PM
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I have all the wood and hardware I need to build my new studio rack. I have a design loosely based on this:

Attached Image

One question for anyone with an existing rack, how far back are your vertical rails recessed from the front? Thanks, hopefully I'll have some build photos soon.


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Kristofer Dahl
post Aug 15 2016, 10:20 PM
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Sorry I know absolutely nothing about this.

I am bouncing the thread and hoping for some input from others!


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 16 2016, 07:07 PM
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I've got half a dozen racks or so and have owned wads more and I measured the ones in use and they are all different from rail to front of box. Some have the rails posted on the outside of the case even. Such as this guy

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories...ide-car--cherry

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something like this is about a half inch depth to front of rack
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If you are building your own, you can really do anything you want as there really isn't a hard and fast rule. You can front mount them or recess them if you like. I wish there was a "Here is the only right answer" sort of thing for this as I know that's usually far more reassuring. Like many things in Music and life, it's a bit more fluid than that.

In practical terms, since you are building your own, I'd suggest picking a depth that allows people to pass in front of the rack without their legs/pants brushing the knobs and changing your settings. As they are up angled, I'd say maybe half an inch or even a full inch, which is a fairly deep recess. You can measure how far the longest knob/button sticks out of your gear and use that as a general guide as well smile.gif
Here is another idea, this design, looks diy, allows for a handy top light without using a rack unit to provide the light, and recesses the knobs, and maximizes desktop space as you are always needing more desktop space in a studio no matter how much you have IMHO smile.gif

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two of my racks are "rails" racks with no sides/back and referred to often as "naked" racks. These are light and cheap to buy. along this line.
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I started with these while I saved for the racks I wanted. SKB racks, with wheels/casters and extendable handle. Makes moving them MUCH easier when needed. The rack on the bottom is made of steel and very sturdy and has rails front and back. I sit SKB on top. The one on bottom never leaves so it doesn't have a front or back removable cover, but it does have wheels smile.gif I no longer buy cases without wheels.

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I"m selling the naked racks now as I don't need em and they don't travel well.




Hope this helps!


Todd






QUOTE (yoncopin @ Aug 15 2016, 10:04 AM) *
I have all the wood and hardware I need to build my new studio rack. I have a design loosely based on this:

Attached Image

One question for anyone with an existing rack, how far back are your vertical rails recessed from the front? Thanks, hopefully I'll have some build photos soon.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Aug 16 2016, 07:15 PM


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yoncopin
post Aug 16 2016, 07:14 PM
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Awesome Todd, thank you so much! I thought about a half an inch would be good, but I think I will measure the pots and knobs I've been using to use as a gauge. The second example looks about like what I had planned, but your design with the lights is really cool and would give me more space to put my combo amp on top. I may have to consider that... I was also designing for caster wheels too, otherwise I'd never be able to access the back.


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 19 2016, 01:16 AM
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Yeah, you can never have too much desktop space in a studio IMHO smile.gif SO maximizing that is always a good thing.

As for wheels, You can nearly flush mount the casters on bottom so that the wheels are inside the cab, next to the rails. The front ones may not be able to turn much, but the back ones can. That way the cabs will look like they are sitting on the ground and are still actually on wheels/casters smile.gif

Or you can do something like these guys where you have screw supports that come down past the wheels to hard mount the cabs a bit more, then screw up in to the cab to allow them to roll.

Attached Image


Todd



QUOTE (yoncopin @ Aug 16 2016, 02:14 PM) *
Awesome Todd, thank you so much! I thought about a half an inch would be good, but I think I will measure the pots and knobs I've been using to use as a gauge. The second example looks about like what I had planned, but your design with the lights is really cool and would give me more space to put my combo amp on top. I may have to consider that... I was also designing for caster wheels too, otherwise I'd never be able to access the back.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Aug 19 2016, 01:19 AM


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