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> Welcome To Rec: Grappa!
Kristofer Dahl
post Oct 24 2016, 08:37 AM
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Grappa, who recently joined the site - has submitted a solid first REC take.

This has earned him the title "Learning Apprentice Player". As you can see, Grappa has kept well within his range and delivered a close to perfect take. Not only does this give him high grades, but more importantly it will result in a super relaxed / clean /controlled technique. He will be able to use it for any style of playing he chooses to.

Congrats and welcome to REC! biggrin.gif


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Fran
post Oct 24 2016, 08:47 AM
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Welcome smile.gif Keep them coming! cool.gif


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Grappa
post Oct 24 2016, 10:31 AM
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Thanks for this Kris and Fran.

I echo Kris' comments regarding the approach to this - my goal with the studies at GMC is to really go back to the start and work through material that I know I should be able to do properly. Yes, I could have charged in with a higher level but even getting to the point performing this piece properly highlighted that my timing was off, that I was generating lots of noise and that my ability to play a 'suitable' vibrato was something that I found a challenge - tbh I'm still not 100% happy with the vibrato.. The point is that even something that seemed pretty simple highlighted weaknesses in my playing and I had to practice to improve!

There are a couple of other things that are great about the REC in my view. #1 is the requirement to video the performance. To get a solid performance in a single take is actually very, very challenging. Composite takes when recording audio nowadays make life easy but there is nowhere to hide with this! #2 is that working under the pressure of trying to do this results in a virtuous circle. Once you do it a bit it gets easier. This translates into the real world of doing it in front of people and don't you want to be at your best when the crowd (or your friends and family) are looking on?

I'm looking forward to posting more stuff and driving improvements in my playing along the way.

Si
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Oct 24 2016, 02:06 PM
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Hi grappa! Those are great thoughts about REC and I can't agree more. I think that this program is one of the most valuable features here, and that combined with the mentoring thread students show really impressive progress.

We are already planning your guitar program so let's start working! smile.gif


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yoncopin
post Oct 24 2016, 02:21 PM
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QUOTE (Grappa @ Oct 24 2016, 05:31 AM) *
Thanks for this Kris and Fran.

I echo Kris' comments regarding the approach to this - my goal with the studies at GMC is to really go back to the start and work through material that I know I should be able to do properly. Yes, I could have charged in with a higher level but even getting to the point performing this piece properly highlighted that my timing was off, that I was generating lots of noise and that my ability to play a 'suitable' vibrato was something that I found a challenge - tbh I'm still not 100% happy with the vibrato.. The point is that even something that seemed pretty simple highlighted weaknesses in my playing and I had to practice to improve!

There are a couple of other things that are great about the REC in my view. #1 is the requirement to video the performance. To get a solid performance in a single take is actually very, very challenging. Composite takes when recording audio nowadays make life easy but there is nowhere to hide with this! #2 is that working under the pressure of trying to do this results in a virtuous circle. Once you do it a bit it gets easier. This translates into the real world of doing it in front of people and don't you want to be at your best when the crowd (or your friends and family) are looking on?

I'm looking forward to posting more stuff and driving improvements in my playing along the way.

Si

I was in the EXACT same place when I started at GMC. I went back to the basics and found when I had to do the single video take I wasn't as clean/good as I wanted to be. The REC program is awesome, really all of GMC, it's just up to you to put it to use. Congrats on your first REC!


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Phil66
post Oct 24 2016, 07:18 PM
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Congratulations on your first REC take Si. Looking forward to watching your journey smile.gif


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“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
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Grappa
post Oct 25 2016, 07:46 AM
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Thanks Phil.

Notice you're in the Black Country... might not mean much to many on this site but I know the area very well!

Regards,

Si
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Phil66
post Oct 25 2016, 08:13 AM
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You live there or used to?


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“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
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Grappa
post Oct 25 2016, 09:10 AM
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I lived most of my 'younger' life in Lichfield but worked in Bilston/Tipton and around the area. I worked in the lock industry as an engineer (not sure if there is anything left of it these days?) The days of a pint of Banks' and a Pork & Stuffing sandwich... happy days..

I moved from shaping bits of metal to moving bits and bytes many years ago but I am still an engineer at heart!

Where abouts are you?

Si
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Phil66
post Oct 25 2016, 09:14 AM
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I live in Kingswinford . Company is www.omegapistons.com



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“Success is not obtained overnight. It comes in installments; you get a little bit today, a little bit tomorrow until the whole package is given out. The day you procrastinate, you lose that day's success.”
Israelmore Ayivor
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Grappa
post Oct 25 2016, 09:17 AM
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Lol - right up my street. Good old precision engineering..
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Todd Simpson
post Oct 27 2016, 09:23 PM
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Welcome to GMC and to REC smile.gif VIDEO is very much a bit part of becoming a better player. I'd say video everything if you can and put it up on youtube in an "unlisted" playlist if you don't want the world looking at it smile.gif Or if you do, just leave it public. Being able to track your progress with video is a big part of the process smile.gif

Todd

QUOTE (Grappa @ Oct 24 2016, 05:31 AM) *
Thanks for this Kris and Fran.

I echo Kris' comments regarding the approach to this - my goal with the studies at GMC is to really go back to the start and work through material that I know I should be able to do properly. Yes, I could have charged in with a higher level but even getting to the point performing this piece properly highlighted that my timing was off, that I was generating lots of noise and that my ability to play a 'suitable' vibrato was something that I found a challenge - tbh I'm still not 100% happy with the vibrato.. The point is that even something that seemed pretty simple highlighted weaknesses in my playing and I had to practice to improve!

There are a couple of other things that are great about the REC in my view. #1 is the requirement to video the performance. To get a solid performance in a single take is actually very, very challenging. Composite takes when recording audio nowadays make life easy but there is nowhere to hide with this! #2 is that working under the pressure of trying to do this results in a virtuous circle. Once you do it a bit it gets easier. This translates into the real world of doing it in front of people and don't you want to be at your best when the crowd (or your friends and family) are looking on?

I'm looking forward to posting more stuff and driving improvements in my playing along the way.

Si


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Darius Wave
post Oct 28 2016, 12:28 PM
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QUOTE (Grappa @ Oct 24 2016, 09:31 AM) *
This translates into the real world of doing it in front of people and don't you want to be at your best when the crowd (or your friends and family) are looking on?


This is a perfect observation. The truth is...we are only as good as we can present ourselfs to the audience. Nobody cares what we are able to play at home, when we're alone and with no pressure. That's a great workout to get introduced to performing for people...in fact that's what we, musicians are for smile.gif

Also you are completely right - making perfect execution over one take is a challenge. This exactly what happens live, at gigs. We start our solos and there is no way back, no chance to stop and redo. Just us, the audience and our ability to handle this "one take" opporutnity smile.gif


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Wyverex
post Oct 28 2016, 12:34 PM
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First of welcome Grappa smile.gif

This is interesting because lately I asked myself, how many takes do you guys actually need to record a video? I find myself re-recording a lot once I start going for a final take. I guess this is a common thing among students, but what about you instructor folks?
When you create a lesson for GMC or a take for an album for example. Do you still struggle to get it right the first time the same as us mere beginners? How many takes does it take you? smile.gif
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MisterM
post Oct 28 2016, 12:50 PM
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Welcome Grappa

Your playing is very good mellow.gif


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Monica Gheorghev...
post Oct 28 2016, 03:50 PM
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Welcome to REC Grappa smile.gif





QUOTE (Wyverex @ Oct 28 2016, 11:34 AM) *
First of welcome Grappa smile.gif

This is interesting because lately I asked myself, how many takes do you guys actually need to record a video? I find myself re-recording a lot once I start going for a final take. I guess this is a common thing among students, but what about you instructor folks?
When you create a lesson for GMC or a take for an album for example. Do you still struggle to get it right the first time the same as us mere beginners? How many takes does it take you? smile.gif

Probably our instructors don't need to record many takes when they create a lesson for us because:
- they have millions hours of practice and a lot of experience based on years of playing live
- is their compositions and contain techniques, details and hand positions which are found in their daily playing.
If I play my compositions I will finish the recording in few minutes. This not happen when I must to record the takes for REC but it's normal because in REC we must cover the instructor playing and feeling. It's not room to apply your own emotions and style if you want to pass the lesson.
- they make for us lessons which are under their technical level of difficulty (because this is what we need and not because they can't play). But, probably the things would stay a little different if we talk about lessons level 10.
- also usually each of them come with lessons from the musical genre where they are masters. It's possible if you give a particular task for each instructor which contain some things that aren't found in their usual playing to put them at a little work. Of course don't get me wrong, they will succeed to make the task to sound amazing but not spending just a few minutes.

From my point of view, I'm sure that everybody has weak points. No matter if it's instructor or it's a very known musician, nobody can't be a God in all the techniques. But....they have very much experience and wisdom to not make their weak points visible. When you are very conscious about your strong and weak points (and constantly you work to get rid of weaknesses), you already have the key to make things shine wink.gif

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MisterM
post Oct 28 2016, 05:20 PM
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Good analyze Monica
I agree with your point of view.
Thank you for your very understandable English smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 28 2016, 11:42 PM
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Well said! smile.gif After a few million hours of practice (about 10 thousand or so honestly), some things do get a lot less frustrating in general. Of course, there are always new bits to learn, but once you put in a few years of intense practice, and self recording/playing live, etc. Thankfully, you don't (at least I don't, I can't speak for everyone of course) get the same tense feeling when that red recording light comes on, which seems to be a death ray during much of the learning process at the early stage. I remember getting some things almost perfect, only to "unlearn" them on cue as soon as a recording began, or I tried to share a lick with guitar pals, band, etc. Some things, just take time and practice. Guitar is one of them smile.gif As I've posted before, it's one of the few things you can't be given, can't be bought, can't be born in to, etc. Gotta earn it, once you do, it's yours always smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Monica Gheorghevici @ Oct 28 2016, 10:50 AM) *
Welcome to REC Grappa smile.gif






Probably our instructors don't need to record many takes when they create a lesson for us because:
- they have millions hours of practice and a lot of experience based on years of playing live
- is their compositions and contain techniques, details and hand positions which are found in their daily playing.
If I play my compositions I will finish the recording in few minutes. This not happen when I must to record the takes for REC but it's normal because in REC we must cover the instructor playing and feeling. It's not room to apply your own emotions and style if you want to pass the lesson.
- they make for us lessons which are under their technical level of difficulty (because this is what we need and not because they can't play). But, probably the things would stay a little different if we talk about lessons level 10.
- also usually each of them come with lessons from the musical genre where they are masters. It's possible if you give a particular task for each instructor which contain some things that aren't found in their usual playing to put them at a little work. Of course don't get me wrong, they will succeed to make the task to sound amazing but not spending just a few minutes.

From my point of view, I'm sure that everybody has weak points. No matter if it's instructor or it's a very known musician, nobody can't be a God in all the techniques. But....they have very much experience and wisdom to not make their weak points visible. When you are very conscious about your strong and weak points (and constantly you work to get rid of weaknesses), you already have the key to make things shine wink.gif


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