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> What Does Cites Mean For Guitar Production In 2017?
Chris Harrington
post Dec 16 2016, 03:43 PM
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Hey everyone,

I just received an email from TimberTones that they are selling off their remaining rosewood plectrums before the new CITES regulation takes effect on January 2nd 2017. ( this regulation also effects three types of Bubinga)

The new regulation can be read here

It looks to be a way of 'cleaning up' where the woods are sourced from. Will be interesting to see how it plays out.

Chris



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klasaine
post Dec 16 2016, 05:25 PM
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Well, new Brazilian rosewood hasn't been available on guitars since the early 70s. Some of the very high end and older manufacturing companies like Martin have/had some older sourced wood but it was/is only available on their most expensive pieces. So I would say very little impact. There's always 'other' wood.

It will affect furniture makers a lot more.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 16 2016, 05:27 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 16 2016, 08:00 PM
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This regulation also impacts ROSEWOOD which is very common for guitar fretboards. It may increase overall costs a bit since some of the cheaper sources of Rosewood may be off the table for some builders now. It may also make other woods more common on guitar fretboards such as MAPLE for example. I'd be fine with that as Maple is my fave fretboard materials (But thats just me I realize).

Good point about Furniture builders. They require wads of timber so they might feel it a bit more.
If it does impact the use of Rosewood on fretboards, it could make guitar with rosewood fretboards a bit more pricey in the secondary/after/used market as well. But we shall see smile.gif Just speculation at this point.

Even if costs don't come in to play, having another layer of regulation on these woods could make them less often used by builders and thus more rare on new instruments, therefore giving value to some older instruments that are made with such woods, simply due to rarity.

It also impacts BUBINGA which is a popular material for making guitar NECKS as it's very strong/stiff wood. Ibanez uses a "Bubinga Stripe" on some guitar necks to make them stronger. Some builders use bubinga for entire guitar bodies/necks. So an old Ibby with Bubinga in the neck and rosewood on the fretboard may get a bit more expensive. They are already a bit expensive so it might make ibby hunters like me pay a bit more for old ibbys smile.gif

Todd

QUOTE (Chris Harrington @ Dec 16 2016, 10:e or43 AM) *
Hey everyone,

I just received an email from TimberTones that they are selling off their remaining rosewood plectrums before the new CITES regulation takes effect on January 2nd 2017. ( this regulation also effects three types of Bubinga)

The new regulation can be read here

It looks to be a way of 'cleaning up' where the woods are sourced from. Will be interesting to see how it plays out.

Chris


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Wyverex
post Dec 17 2016, 02:39 PM
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Besides the increased cost, the main effect will probably be a huge increase in delivery times if you order a guitar in another country:

QUOTE
For sellers in the United States, CITES re-export certificates must be applied for through the US Fish and Wildlife Service. You can download the application here.

Representatives of the agency have said that initial turnaround times on certificate application may be on the order of months.


That's just for the US but I guess it will be similar in other countries. Since the new regulation is taking effect in a very short timeframe, this will probably create huge demand and confusion. And while there will certainly be other woods being used more often in the future, rosewood won't go away in guitar production over night and there are large stocks of guitars sitting around waiting to be shipped all over the world.

So if you've ordered a new guitar you are probably in for a long wait mellow.gif
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Todd Simpson
post Dec 17 2016, 09:48 PM
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Sadly you have a point. Until the regs get sorted into the distrubutors pipeline and everyone gets comfy, things may get delayed a bit. The price of guitars on the rack with these woods may bump a bit here especially in the short term. Hope it doesn't keep folks from getting the guitars they want smile.gif


QUOTE (Wyverex @ Dec 17 2016, 09:39 AM) *
Besides the increased cost, the main effect will probably be a huge increase in delivery times if you order a guitar in another country:



That's just for the US but I guess it will be similar in other countries. Since the new regulation is taking effect in a very short timeframe, this will probably create huge demand and confusion. And while there will certainly be other woods being used more often in the future, rosewood won't go away in guitar production over night and there are large stocks of guitars sitting around waiting to be shipped all over the world.

So if you've ordered a new guitar you are probably in for a long wait mellow.gif



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Darius Wave
post Dec 19 2016, 10:32 AM
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I think we are now economically connected soooo much, that it hardly happens to see a situation in one country not affect other countires...especially if we speak of countries like U.S.A. World is changing, maybe someday we'll be trying to remember how it was to play on the guitar made of wood....

Or this is just a manipulation to reserve pieces of "best stuff" for minor group of people who doesn't know the word "expensive". I always wonder how much it's a real thing of taking care of nature and how much a lobby boosting an interest of particular group of business...


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