Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Some Guitars And Pedals
klasaine
post Dec 17 2016, 04:55 PM
Post #1


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I did use most of it ...

Attached Image

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 17 2016, 05:02 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Caelumamittendum
post Dec 17 2016, 06:03 PM
Post #2


Learning Rock Star
*

Group: Members
Posts: 4.669
Joined: 14-June 08
From: Copenhagen, Denmark
Member No.: 5.298



What is this from? smile.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Dec 17 2016, 08:07 PM
Post #3


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Dec 17 2016, 10:03 AM) *
What is this from? smile.gif


Soundtrack recording for a video game.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Dec 17 2016, 09:01 PM
Post #4


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.792
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



Nice pedalboard, Ken - what is it?


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Mertay
post Dec 17 2016, 09:33 PM
Post #5


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Senior
Posts: 3.081
Joined: 27-May 13
From: Turkey / izmir
Member No.: 18.294



heheeh yeah looks great but I could recognize very few of them biggrin.gif


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Dec 17 2016, 10:06 PM
Post #6


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Dec 17 2016, 01:01 PM) *
Nice pedalboard, Ken - what is it?


The board or the session?

The session is for a video game, probably to be released sometime in 2017. I don't even know the name - ? *They don't always tell you that stuff.

The actual pedal board was custom made by the A&S Case company here in L.A.. It comes in heavy duty flight case. Almost 20 years old now.


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Ben Higgins
post Dec 18 2016, 07:08 PM
Post #7


Instructor
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 13.792
Joined: 11-March 10
From: England
Member No.: 9.820



QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 17 2016, 09:06 PM) *
The actual pedal board was custom made by the A&S Case company here in L.A.. It comes in heavy duty flight case. Almost 20 years old now.


Yes, it was the board I was eyeing up - looks great. I'm thinking of making my own pedalboard soon out of a bit of wood but am wondering how to transport the thing. It shouldn't be that big, it'll only take 4 pedals when it's done


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Dec 18 2016, 09:43 PM
Post #8


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



I have smaller boards that I've put in old briefcases and camera cases ...

Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Dec 24 2016, 01:27 AM
Post #9


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.300
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Cool! Can you share with the GMCers any tips on getting in to working in game music?

Thanks smile.gif

Todd



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Dec 24 2016, 02:24 AM
Post #10


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Dec 23 2016, 05:27 PM) *
Cool! Can you share with the GMCers any tips on getting in to working in game music?

Thanks smile.gif

Todd


Man, I wish I had one concise or even a few concise answers for you but the reality is that if you ask 50 game composers how they broke into gaming music you'll get 50 different stories.

Having said that ...

1) I'm not a composer. I'm just a hired session player.
2) I do know and work for composers so I will tell you what I've noticed over the years.

It's not too much different than being a movie or TV composer. They all know how to 'compose' for orchestra. Most went to music school and were composition majors at least for a couple years or took some film music classes. Many schools today offer specific composing for video games classes. You should have decent piano skills, good programming skills and you need to be precise and attentive to detail.

Most of the composers (at least the one's I've worked with) also do TV and movies. Actually I should say they do ALL manner of media which can include ... sound design, re-mixing, looped tracks for a fashion show, in-flight public service announcements, movie trailers, etc.

The game composers I know, like to 'play' video games.

Games have some unique elements related to their play that you have make allowances for. The most obvious or most observable is that almost every piece needs to have a clean 'loop point'. Because play stops, or continues, or changes, etc.

As for breaking in - assuming you've got the skills ...
The same way you'd break into doing films. Write the music for a 'student' film for free. Go to gaming conventions, go to colleges that have video game classes, work with a new developer who's developing a new game, do the music for free or an agreed upon fee after the game is (hopefully) picked up or sold. Normal networking stuff. And these days 'normal' means meeting/communicating with some of these folks on-line. So wherever the video game people hang out in cyberspace - ?
But folks will need to hear something, so ...
Have an example of your work. Take a piece of an existing video game footage (or film footage) and compose new music for it. Do at least 3 differing examples: Super violent, 1st person shooter death/djent/speed metal ... desolate alien landscape ambient ... and maybe some dragons/trolls/wizards preparing for epic battle type music (think LOTR or Gladiator).

Something that I've noticed lately is that a lot of game developers are letting the consumer purchase (or maybe it's even free?) different music 'kits' for some games. I don't completely understand how this works but here's one I worked on last year. It's like a funk/jazz soundtrack and there are obviously others you can get: metal, techno, electronica, retro game, etc.
*The comments are hysterical ...



This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 24 2016, 11:27 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Dec 25 2016, 05:57 AM
Post #11


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.300
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Thanks very much for the info. I did do a bit of theory in College but I certainly could not orchestrate. Going the "Kit" route may be something more doable smile.gif I'd never heard of those so thanks for the tip!

Found the web site where they sell all kinds of kits for music and sound fx. Very spiff!

https://csgostash.com/music


Todd

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Dec 25 2016, 05:59 AM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
klasaine
post Dec 26 2016, 08:16 PM
Post #12


GMC:er
*

Group: Members
Posts: 2.942
Joined: 30-December 12
From: Los Angeles, CA
Member No.: 17.304



QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Dec 24 2016, 09:57 PM) *
I did do a bit of theory in College but I certainly could not orchestrate.


It's really not about how much harmony and theory you know. Most games and films are 'temped' with existing music. usually other film and game music. Can you recognize and distill what the new developer or producer likes about the temp music? *Listen to a lot of Wagner, Prokofiev, Stravinski, electronica, metal and ethnic (Arabic, Indian, Celtic, etc.).

Like I said, the one's 'I' work for know how to do that hence they hire players (me for example). I'm sure there are plenty that don't necessarily know how to orchestrate in the academic sense but can hear it enough to do it themselves on a keyboard with a really good sample library. For the really high end stuff where the developer wants a real orchestra they may (and probably do) hire a professional orchestrator. Movies are the same. The bottom line is that if you can give the client what they're looking for in a quick 'mock up' you'll get the gig. And then you go from there.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 26 2016, 08:25 PM


--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Todd Simpson
post Dec 27 2016, 04:21 AM
Post #13


GMC:er
Group Icon

Group: GMC Instructor
Posts: 15.300
Joined: 23-December 09
From: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Member No.: 8.794



Now as far as "ear balling it" I could pull that off smile.gif My music tastes run pretty eclectic despite my being a bit of a Metal Head. I hear ya about getting in by just offering to do it for free. It's often the way with industries. You gotta prove yourself, often for free, and as folks rise, they often bring you with as they know and trust you. Such is life eh? When I was teaching I found that many students wanted to skip that part and go directly from college to the highly paid positions in question. I tried my best to explain that their degree was NOT in fact the magic glue between here and there in most cases. It's just proof that you paid someone to try to teach you some things and you made enough effort to graduate. Needless to say I was called on the carpet by more than one Departmental Dean for bit a bit to "real" with the students. sad.gif

Todd

QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 26 2016, 03:16 PM) *
It's really not about how much harmony and theory you know. Most games and films are 'temped' with existing music. usually other film and game music. Can you recognize and distill what the new developer or producer likes about the temp music? *Listen to a lot of Wagner, Prokofiev, Stravinski, electronica, metal and ethnic (Arabic, Indian, Celtic, etc.).

Like I said, the one's 'I' work for know how to do that hence they hire players (me for example). I'm sure there are plenty that don't necessarily know how to orchestrate in the academic sense but can hear it enough to do it themselves on a keyboard with a really good sample library. For the really high end stuff where the developer wants a real orchestra they may (and probably do) hire a professional orchestrator. Movies are the same. The bottom line is that if you can give the client what they're looking for in a quick 'mock up' you'll get the gig. And then you go from there.



--------------------
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 


RSS Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 23rd November 2017 - 06:25 AM