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PosterBoy
post Jan 4 2017, 07:55 AM
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One of my favourite bands Story of the year are currently recording their new album and have used Pledge Music to help fund it. Of course I pledged and now get to see video updates of the process.

Now it's probably part necessity and part technology but modern recording does lack the romance of recording records in years gone by.

The songs have had scratch tracks done and now each of the members are recording their parts in their individual home studios (except drums) guitars first, then bass, then vocals and last drums. The producer Aaron Sprinkles is in Nashville and gets the tracks via ftp and works his magic with reamping, adding any extras etc. He will be present for the vocal takes.

It doesn't seem like the old days of a group of friends (or people that hate each other) feeding off each other and making magic locked away in a studio for a few weeks or months.

Cost wise I'm sure this is so much cheaper and these guys aren't young anymore and have families, responsibilities and other things they have to do to make a living, even so it makes me a little sad.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jan 4 2017, 02:39 PM
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That's interesting. I've recorded an album in this way around 10 years ago with a bass player and it was a very cool experience. Nowadays is very normal for me to record guest solos or guitar tracks at my studio and then send it to the producer of the albums in which I'm invited to play. I obviously prefer the old school way of recording an album, but sometimes it's the only way to record an album, because of the two factors that determine everything: money and time.

The new technologies provide more possibilities so I can only feel happy about it.


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Mertay
post Jan 4 2017, 02:42 PM
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Yeah its almost impossible these days cost-wise to rent a studio for weeks. With home recording, we can say they're where they are most comfortable as another advantage.

There are definitly advantages but specially as an end result I can't hear albums to be a whole anymore (like a long story with connected pieces). Probably an unexpect result but the composing phase to me gets most affected somehow.

As for sound, studio to me helps the overall feel of depth most compared to home recording but with modern mastered albums not many listeners care for it.


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Rammikin
post Jan 4 2017, 03:14 PM
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Yeah, it's pretty rare these days for a group to gather in a studio for weeks to record together. Check out this documentary about the making of the latest Periphery album. (Mertay, this shows the album format is still alive and well smile.gif) Plenty of modern recording technology, but still has the element of close cooperation.



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klasaine
post Jan 4 2017, 04:55 PM
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Just for a little perspective ...

Ever since the Beatles started serious multi tracking, using two 4-trk machines, and over here in the states Tom Dowd at Atlantic had 8 trk machines, artists have recorded separately a lot of the time. Especially once a good bass and drum part got put down vocals and solos as well as more orchestrated parts got to have more time dedicated to them. Witness Sgt. Peppers or Pet Sounds or Dark Side of the Moon.

It's really cool to watch all those great 'the making of' documentaries (I'm addicted to them) but it's all condensed time. No one, not even a musician in the band wants to sit around while the lead singer is cutting a final vocal or the guitar player is punching in some notes on a solo or god forbid there's a tech problem that takes hours to figure out, etc.
Coming in and cutting your part(s) when they're ready for has been common since the late 60s. The only real difference now is that instead of going to the same studio to do your parts you can do it at home. But even that happened in the old days. Sometimes band members were geographically far apart for whatever reason and they'd send the tapes to wherever said band member (or producer) was.

In the 60s they pined about how they did it in the 50s. In the 70s they reminisced about the 60s. The 80s - the 70s. Etc.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Jan 4 2017, 04:58 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Jan 5 2017, 08:14 AM
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My buddy Matt Rowles and I felt the same way so I helped him use gear from some computer labs where we worked to make live recordings of bands. We wanted to create that "Magic" again that used to happen when you get musicians together and getting them jamming off of one another. He's just celebrated more than 10 years doing the show now called indieatl.com which is carried on demand via comcast and of course online. I've talked about this show quite a bit over the years here on GMC as it's got so many "Teachable Moments" in it.

In this case, that it is still possible to get guys in a room, and for little or not cost (Matt doesn't charge to record bands, he provides the method and the band provide the music so it works as a barter arrangement. That way he can do what he loves (making live music happen) and share it with the world online.

He doesn't use an audience anymore so it's not a "concert" vibe. It's more like how the beatles or stones used to record back in the day. Everybody playing at once to multi track.

If anyone has a band that they like, I'd say contact Matt and suggest the band for a show/recording. He is always open to new bands. smile.gif He then offers them the vids, and source/mixed tracks as well.

EDIT: Here is a link to his website about his show.
http://www.indieatl.com/
Todd

This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Feb 16 2017, 06:47 PM


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Darius Wave
post Jan 9 2017, 11:02 AM
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Yeah bro...I get what you mean. I miss those days too. Recording an album was more spiritual experience, and one of few things (like hours spent together in the bus), that made a band be literally an alternative family. The way world evolves these days, makes us all more and more separated from each other. We can have remote jobs (sitting on PC at home), we can record tracks at home and send them to a server, we can talk to our friends and share private moments in the social media. I'm afraid that this physicall lonelyness filled with virtual activity will be a domain of next period. I have a huge hope and belief that as with anything else before, people will get tired of this someday, and a kind of reasonable proportion of virtuality will be present in our lifes.

I think I can have that belief relaying on my own life. I remember the facebook and youtube boom. Same as many, I was almost always online, but at some point I realized it's a blind path and started to limit my activity for the sake of normal life. Now I do in fact have my PC turned on all day, but it's usually for work and some "just in case" unexpected recordings. I hardly find myself having using facebook to have "no point" kind of conversations with friends. Now it's a "wanna talk? let's meet or call" rule.

I have also found that especially young people where respecing time much more back then. When you need to pay for a phone call, you where taking somebody's time only as much as necessary. Now on the facebook I sometimes have a few teens wasting all their evenings bombing me with tons of questions...because they have their "free after school time" and the conversations does not cost them any cash at all....so they just write. Haven't you had similar situations ?smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post Feb 16 2017, 06:52 PM
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I'm glad you brought this up. As my youtube channel got bigger, I started getting more questions than I could ever answer. Eventually, I was forced to simply stop answering and just point people to my Saturday Live Sessions on GMC as the place to ask questions. This caused a bit of a backlash on my youtube site as it was seen sort of like product placement or an advert instead of me just trying to help as many folks as possible.

Thankfully, there are now hundreds of guitar guys on youtube that can answer the flood of questions. The bad news is that so many are the same questions over and over. Folks don't tend to read the replies on youtube, so they don't realize often that a given question has been asked and answered 20 times.

I began to focus my attention more on GMC than on social media as it was a more focused audience and more manageable in terms of size. Also, repeat questions can be simply linked to the thread where they have already been answered in depth.

In short, I just shifted to helping students here smile.gif

Todd



QUOTE (Darius Wave @ Jan 9 2017, 06:02 AM) *
Yeah bro...I get what you mean. I miss those days too. Recording an album was more spiritual experience, and one of few things (like hours spent together in the bus), that made a band be literally an alternative family. The way world evolves these days, makes us all more and more separated from each other. We can have remote jobs (sitting on PC at home), we can record tracks at home and send them to a server, we can talk to our friends and share private moments in the social media. I'm afraid that this physicall lonelyness filled with virtual activity will be a domain of next period. I have a huge hope and belief that as with anything else before, people will get tired of this someday, and a kind of reasonable proportion of virtuality will be present in our lifes.

I think I can have that belief relaying on my own life. I remember the facebook and youtube boom. Same as many, I was almost always online, but at some point I realized it's a blind path and started to limit my activity for the sake of normal life. Now I do in fact have my PC turned on all day, but it's usually for work and some "just in case" unexpected recordings. I hardly find myself having using facebook to have "no point" kind of conversations with friends. Now it's a "wanna talk? let's meet or call" rule.

I have also found that especially young people where respecing time much more back then. When you need to pay for a phone call, you where taking somebody's time only as much as necessary. Now on the facebook I sometimes have a few teens wasting all their evenings bombing me with tons of questions...because they have their "free after school time" and the conversations does not cost them any cash at all....so they just write. Haven't you had similar situations ? smile.gif


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