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> Playing On Time
liveOASISforever
post Feb 14 2017, 10:27 PM
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I searched GMC about timing and found my post from 2012

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/guitar_fo...showtopic=47274

Still to this day I feel I that I have not improved. I have being playing guitar on and off since that post. I just get so frustrated with trying to play on time I tend to just pick the guitar up these days and noodle about.

I have said to myself so many times that I am going to really focus and try to get better regarding timing and end up driving myself crazy and dont want to pick the guitar up.

I understand playing with a metronome and practicing sub divisions which is not what I find the problem. The problem I have is when learning a lesson and playing along in time. i will take small sections, slow them down and practice with the metronome.Then once the full lesson is learned this way and I try to play along with the backing track.This is where it ends up all over the place.I just cant seem to connect with it and feel it. A know this might sound stupid but its as if my head just feels numb and I struggle to focus or concentrate.

Anyway I am going to try and overcome this.Feel like a have said this to myself a million times.
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Gabriel Leopardi
post Feb 15 2017, 01:53 PM
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Hi Sean!

There are many approaches and exercises that you can do to improve this but you need to give priority to this and focus on it. I think that rhythm (and so timing) are the base of everything.

I wonder if you usually play with a drummer. Being in a band situation and rehearsing songs with a drummer is the best rhythm training that you can have.

Also, I've recently found this lessons that are really good for this topic:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Rhythm-Figures-Workout/

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Rhythm...res-Workout-II/


I recommend you to create a routine that covers different rhythm topics, and record your whole sessions to then analyse your progress and see what things need attention.

Diary practice, a good guitar plan and recording yourself are the keys.


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klasaine
post Feb 15 2017, 03:50 PM
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+1 to everything Gab just mentioned. Especially the part about playing with a band or at least a drummer. It is the best way to get your timing down. There's really no substitute.

I will add that most timing problems (within songs) manifest in the 'transitions' between the different sections. Practicing the transitions is something that we don't think about doing. And we have to do it the same way - slow, medium, fast.

Also, it's very important (once you know all the parts slowly) to practice the entire song slowly. Do not play the song (or set the metronome) any faster than you can play the hardest part. Don't stop to correct mistakes. Try to get all the way through, no matter what, then correct a technical problem. Keep doing this. Only increase the tempo when you can not make a mistake.

Don't practice until you get it right. Practice until you can't get it wrong.


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Phil66
post Feb 15 2017, 06:41 PM
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The best way I've found, and I'm no expert, is that once you have the piece under your fingers, put the lesson track into your DAW. Use download helper HERE which will download the lesson video and convert to MP3. I've only managed to get it to work in Firefox though but it is well worth having.

Step 1: Play along with the track a few times, there are so many distractions when the band kicks in so the instructor's guitar will keep you on track.

Step 2: Record yourself playing along with the lesson track, play back and listen carefully. I pan the track hard right and myself hard left on playback, I find it better that way.

Step 3: Isolate any parts that are persistently out of time and practise them. Slow down the BPM until you get it right then gradually speed up.

Step 4: Put the backing track into your DAW. Line it up with the lesson track. Mute the lesson track and record yourself along with the backing. Play back with the lesson track with the instructor's guitar on. This will highlight problem areas.

Step 5: Repeat step 3

I hope this helps.

Good luck.

This post has been edited by Phil66: Feb 15 2017, 08:45 PM


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Anders Karlsson
post Feb 15 2017, 07:34 PM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Feb 15 2017, 06:41 PM) *
The best way I've found, and I'm no expert, is that once you have the piece under your fingers, put the lesson track into your DAW. Use download helper "Google it" to download the lesson video and convert to MP3.

Step 1: Play along with the track a few times, there are so many distractions when the band kicks in so the instructor's guitar will keep you on track.

Step 2: Record yourself playing along with the lesson track, play back and listen carefully. I pan the track hard right and myself hard left on playback, I find it better that way.

Step 3: Isolate any parts that are persistently out of time and practise them. Slow down the BPM until you get it right then gradually speed up.

Step 4: Put the backing track into your DAW. Line it up with the lesson track. Mute the lesson track and record yourself along with the backing. Play back with the lesson track with the instructor's guitar on. This will highlight problem areas.

Step 5: Repeat step 3

I hope this helps.

Good luck.

Very good advice Phil.
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liveOASISforever
post Feb 15 2017, 10:01 PM
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QUOTE (Gabriel Leopardi @ Feb 15 2017, 12:53 PM) *
Hi Sean!

There are many approaches and exercises that you can do to improve this but you need to give priority to this and focus on it. I think that rhythm (and so timing) are the base of everything.

I wonder if you usually play with a drummer. Being in a band situation and rehearsing songs with a drummer is the best rhythm training that you can have.

Also, I've recently found this lessons that are really good for this topic:

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Rhythm-Figures-Workout/

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/Rhythm...res-Workout-II/


I recommend you to create a routine that covers different rhythm topics, and record your whole sessions to then analyse your progress and see what things need attention.

Diary practice, a good guitar plan and recording yourself are the keys.


Hi Gab

All my attention for the next while will be going back to basics and implementing different rhythms.

I have never played with a drummer or any other musician. I am just a bedroom guitarist.

I have made a new folder in my bookmarks and added these two lessons.Im going to really focus on them and will provide some recordings in the near future.

Thanks for the advice smile.gif

QUOTE (klasaine @ Feb 15 2017, 02:50 PM) *
+1 to everything Gab just mentioned. Especially the part about playing with a band or at least a drummer. It is the best way to get your timing down. There's really no substitute.

I will add that most timing problems (within songs) manifest in the 'transitions' between the different sections. Practicing the transitions is something that we don't think about doing. And we have to do it the same way - slow, medium, fast.

Also, it's very important (once you know all the parts slowly) to practice the entire song slowly. Do not play the song (or set the metronome) any faster than you can play the hardest part. Don't stop to correct mistakes. Try to get all the way through, no matter what, then correct a technical problem. Keep doing this. Only increase the tempo when you can not make a mistake.

Don't practice until you get it right. Practice until you can't get it wrong.


Very good advice Ken. All has being taken on board.

Thanks smile.gif

QUOTE (Phil66 @ Feb 15 2017, 05:41 PM) *
The best way I've found, and I'm no expert, is that once you have the piece under your fingers, put the lesson track into your DAW. Use download helper HERE which will download the lesson video and convert to MP3. I've only managed to get it to work in Firefox though but it is well worth having.

Step 1: Play along with the track a few times, there are so many distractions when the band kicks in so the instructor's guitar will keep you on track.

Step 2: Record yourself playing along with the lesson track, play back and listen carefully. I pan the track hard right and myself hard left on playback, I find it better that way.

Step 3: Isolate any parts that are persistently out of time and practise them. Slow down the BPM until you get it right then gradually speed up.

Step 4: Put the backing track into your DAW. Line it up with the lesson track. Mute the lesson track and record yourself along with the backing. Play back with the lesson track with the instructor's guitar on. This will highlight problem areas.

Step 5: Repeat step 3

I hope this helps.

Good luck.


This is definately something I need to try. I need to purchase a audio interface. As soon as I do I will give this a go.

Cheers Phil

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Phil66
post Feb 15 2017, 10:25 PM
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To be honest Sean, if you are a bedroom guitarist this is the only way I can see to do it, you really need to be able to record yourself, it's amazing how much it helps because when you are actually playing it's hard to analyse yourself, it is a skill that comes with time but it isn't easy that's why it's necessary to record and playback to analyse.

Audio interfaces are good money now. https://www.musicmatter.co.uk/lists/best-us...faces-under-100 and there's always Ebay. I'd recommend the Focusrite personally, I haven't had a blip with my 18i8 smile.gif

Looking forward to hearing your takes smile.gif


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liveOASISforever
post Feb 16 2017, 08:20 AM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Feb 15 2017, 09:25 PM) *
To be honest Sean, if you are a bedroom guitarist this is the only way I can see to do it, you really need to be able to record yourself, it's amazing how much it helps because when you are actually playing it's hard to analyse yourself, it is a skill that comes with time but it isn't easy that's why it's necessary to record and playback to analyse.

Audio interfaces are good money now. https://www.musicmatter.co.uk/lists/best-us...faces-under-100 and there's always Ebay. I'd recommend the Focusrite personally, I haven't had a blip with my 18i8 smile.gif

Looking forward to hearing your takes smile.gif


Just purchased a Focusrite Scarlett solo 2nd gen of Amazon. Should be here tomorrow smile.gif

I had a Focusrite audio interface not to long ago. It was the 1st gen 2i2. I also never had a issue with it and really liked it.Then it got sold when I bought my eleven rack. Recently just sold my eleven rack to buy a Boss katana amp.Now am buying a Focusrite audio interface again. laugh.gif

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Grappa
post Feb 16 2017, 08:40 AM
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IMHO opinion all the things stated here are great for improving timing and ultimately it's down to being brutally honest with yourself and more practice.

Gab gave me a great piece of advice on one of my rec takes which was to sway or nod my head whilst playing. Get into the groove physically as it were.. I've tried this and it really helps.. When playing standing up (especially in a band context) this sort of happens more naturally but when in my practice room and playing seated I found I wasn't doing this anywhere near as much as I should be and it was having a negative impact.

Hope this helps.

Si

This post has been edited by Grappa: Feb 16 2017, 08:41 AM
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