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> How Do You Practice Scales?
Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 27 2017, 01:26 PM
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Hello guys!

Knowing scales is essential for any guitar player who want to be able to compose, improvise, and it's also a great help when trying to learn songs and solos by ear.

Here are some questions about this to see where you are:

- Do you think that you know all the scales that you need and/or would like to learn?

- How do you practice scales?


Some inspiration:



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HaveGuitar
post Apr 27 2017, 04:26 PM
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No... I mainly used the penta for 30 years (with some variations) and that's one of the reasons I'm here *laughs*

I recently learnt the mixolydian so at first I just ran that up and down the fretboard. Then once I had that nailed somewhat I try to use parts of it in my solos. I have found it works to use 4-6 notes from the mixolydian and just jump back to the penta position again. Creates a bit of that unexpected thing that still can sound pretty sweet.


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verciazghra
post Apr 27 2017, 05:50 PM
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I don't really use scales. Neither when I'm writing or when I'm improvising. I've practiced scales in a number of different ways. Singing, up and down, sequences, improvising, naming each note as I go, I find that it has helped my playing quite a bit but I think the singing and sequences is the most important one.

I mainly go by ear eventhough I've played scales for probably 10 000 hours.


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 27 2017, 06:26 PM
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QUOTE (HaveGuitar @ Apr 27 2017, 12:26 PM) *
No... I mainly used the penta for 30 years (with some variations) and that's one of the reasons I'm here *laughs*

I recently learnt the mixolydian so at first I just ran that up and down the fretboard. Then once I had that nailed somewhat I try to use parts of it in my solos. I have found it works to use 4-6 notes from the mixolydian and just jump back to the penta position again. Creates a bit of that unexpected thing that still can sound pretty sweet.



Good approach! Yeah, that's how guitarists like Slash and Zakk Wylde use it, as well as lots of Jazz, Blues and Fusion guitarists.

In this video, Guthrie shows a similar approach applied to every mode.



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Tom51
post Apr 27 2017, 06:27 PM
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As beginner I practice scales, minor pentatonic and minor and major scale. I choose a key and then play one scale up and down or try to start at different positions or strings. But I feel uncertain about my way of doing this.
Should I better play in a musical context? I also want to learn modes and understand how to apply them.
What is a good way to learn scales Gab?

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Gabriel Leopardi
post Apr 27 2017, 06:37 PM
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QUOTE (verciazghra @ Apr 27 2017, 01:50 PM) *
I don't really use scales. Neither when I'm writing or when I'm improvising. I've practiced scales in a number of different ways. Singing, up and down, sequences, improvising, naming each note as I go, I find that it has helped my playing quite a bit but I think the singing and sequences is the most important one.

I mainly go by ear eventhough I've played scales for probably 10 000 hours.



There are other 2 advantages that we can get by practising scales:

- Technique
- Ear training


The fact that you've practised scales that much surely developed your ear.



QUOTE (Tom51 @ Apr 27 2017, 02:27 PM) *
As beginner I practice scales, minor pentatonic and minor and major scale. I choose a key and then play one scale up and down or try to start at different positions or strings. But I feel uncertain about my way of doing this.
Should I better play in a musical context? I also want to learn modes and understand how to apply them.
What is a good way to learn scales Gab?



I would recommend something similar to what HaveGuitar said. These are some ideas:

- Learn the scale up and down in 5 positions (related to the CAGED system)
- Practice Scale sequences to train your ears and fingers.
- Experiment over the root chord (One Chord Vamp Backing) so see how each note sounds.
- Improvise over backing tracks.
- Learn licks that are build with that scale. Practice them and variations over a backing track.

- Harmonise the scale in triads, then in 4 notes chords. Build chord progressions.





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