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> Characteristic Notes Of Harmonic Minor Modes
Randy B
post Apr 30 2017, 11:47 PM
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So I already know what the characteristic notes of each mode of the major scale is. For example the mode Lydian the characteristic note is the #4. I want to know what each characteristic note of every mode of the harmonic minor scale is though. Can someone tell me what each one is, or help? Or is this not important? (I think it is, since I love harmonic minor)

QUOTE (Randy B @ Apr 30 2017, 10:36 PM) *
So I already know what the characteristic notes of each mode of the major scale is. For example the mode Lydian the characteristic note is the #4. I want to know what each characteristic note of every mode of the harmonic minor scale is though. Can someone tell me what each one is, or help? Or is this not important? (I think it is, since I love harmonic minor)

PS, I already know how to harmonize the scale, and know how to build chords, and solo with the scale, and I play metal. I see info for the major scale on this topic, but not harmonic minor.
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MonkeyDAthos
post May 1 2017, 08:04 PM
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Don't know if that's the thing are looking for.
Those charts are in F harmonic minor, moving up in the key.
My best advice would be to play:
F harmonic minor against FmM7.
Locrian #6 against Fm7b5
Ionian #5 against Fmajor7#5
So on and so on..

The Phrygian #3 or Phrygian Major can sound pretty sweet in metal like solos IMO.

So you can get a feeling of you each mode.
And if you into getting in the Melodic Minor Realm.

https://www.guitarmasterclass.net/ls/7-Mode...inor-in-7-Keys/
That's probably the lesson.

This post has been edited by MonkeyDAthos: May 1 2017, 08:09 PM


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klasaine
post May 2 2017, 02:25 PM
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The 'characteristic' note (or notes) will be where that leap of a minor 3rd happens and then to some degree the 1/2 step that follows.
For example, in A Harm. Min. it's the E to F to G#. That's the money in any mode of the harmonic minor.


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Randy B
post May 6 2017, 01:33 AM
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Thanks for the reply! That chart I already know the chords, and the harmonized scale. I like your ideas and about where the minor 3rds are. I really wanted to pinpoint each mode down to 1 characteristic note however. I suppose that's not as easy as the major scale smile.gif
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klasaine
post May 8 2017, 02:45 PM
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I don't think it's so easy with the major scale either.

It's never 'one' note. It's the relationship of that note to one other (or a couple others) in the scale.
For example Lydian ...
Yeah, the #4. But that note only reveals it's characteristic sound when used in context with the root and/or against whatever chord you're playing underneath it.

We say that Dorian's characteristic tone is the natural 6th but major, mixolydian, lydian and melodic minor also have a natural 6th in them. It's all about context.

This post has been edited by klasaine: May 8 2017, 02:47 PM


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