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> Studio One Anyone?
Mertay
post May 28 2017, 01:41 PM
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For a while I've noticed some buzz going on with this DAW, even a mastering engineer I know and respect ditched his protools HD system and started using it. A few times I've read comments comparing it to Logic, which gives good idea what sort of a platform we'd expect.

I only tested it when it was new, remember as being nice but noting special then didn't flollow what sort of updates they did. Just curious do we have any members here using this DAW?

This post has been edited by Mertay: May 28 2017, 01:42 PM


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Rammikin
post May 28 2017, 03:40 PM
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While it's not my primary DAW, I use Studio One frequently. It was created by some former Steinberg employees and started out as a Cubase alternative that addressed some of basic flaws they perceived in Cubase. For example, Studio One was one of the first DAW's to adopt a single window layout. From the beginning the strength of Studio One has been the focus on workflow. If your goal to produce an album, Studio One has features that help guide the flow of getting ideas down, stitching them together into songs, and assembling those into an album. Presonus really did have the big picture in mind of what a musician does with a DAW, instead of focussing on every little feature that somebody might want. That was really refreshing when it was new. Over the years, while it is still distinctive, inevitably they've had to add some features that customers liked in competitors and vice versa, with the result IMHO that it doesn't stand out quite as much as it used to.


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Mertay
post May 28 2017, 06:12 PM
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QUOTE (Rammikin @ May 28 2017, 02:40 PM) *
If your goal to produce an album, Studio One has features that help guide the flow of getting ideas down, stitching them together into songs, and assembling those into an album.


Thanks, could you open up my quote a bit? As someone not into electronica, I keep thinking midi when reading sentences like that smile.gif

What I mean is here probably %90 of the members really don't need extreme control (automating vsti filters etc.) on midi/vsti, but want to create their (mostly .wav based) own ideas+loop them somehow etc. without getting lost, stuck or confused. Say, would you recommend it for a GMC'er who's into classic rock, pop etc. over other DAW? would he/she find it easier than Reaper without having a need to switch to something else in the forseeable future?

This post has been edited by Mertay: May 28 2017, 06:31 PM


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Rammikin
post May 29 2017, 12:02 AM
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I understand what you're saying, but the things I have in mind aren't about midi at all. For example, the scratch pad in Studio One is great for song writing sessions where you want to experiment with song structure ideas. Or the project window is awesome for mastering multiple songs in a project, while going back and forth to the individual songs.

For a beginner, I would recommend a single window DAW like GarageBand, Tracktion, Logic, Digital Performer, or Studio One. Most of the major DAWs these days have inexpensive versions you can start with, so you can use them without making a major investment.

As time goes by though, DAWs tend to become more similar as they play catch up and match the features found in the competition. Look at comping. They've all been copying each other for about five years now smile.gif.


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Mertay
post May 29 2017, 12:09 AM
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Excellent reply thanks smile.gif


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Todd Simpson
post May 29 2017, 02:28 AM
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Indeed a great reply wink.gif. Garage Band is a great place to start since the new LOGIC X can look just like garage band so that you can make the transition right away. Once you feel like expanding, just turn on the advanced tools and it's like "super garage band" still a very simple interface and all the MIDI, Wave loops, VST, drums modules, synth, modules, even guitar/bass amp emulators and stomp box effects are all built int. Many producers use it by itself so that they can sit down anywhere and pull up their project on any logic station using just the built in tools. It's vastly deep in terms of what it comes with yet simple to use.. It's my favorite DAW ever, and one of the only reasons to own a Mac. If they made logic for windows I'd be running a pc and spending the extra money on guitars.


QUOTE (Rammikin @ May 28 2017, 07:02 PM) *
I understand what you're saying, but the things I have in mind aren't about midi at all. For example, the scratch pad in Studio One is great for song writing sessions where you want to experiment with song structure ideas. Or the project window is awesome for mastering multiple songs in a project, while going back and forth to the individual songs.

For a beginner, I would recommend a single window DAW like GarageBand, Tracktion, Logic, Digital Performer, or Studio One. Most of the major DAWs these days have inexpensive versions you can start with, so you can use them without making a major investment.

As time goes by though, DAWs tend to become more similar as they play catch up and match the features found in the competition. Look at comping. They've all been copying each other for about five years now smile.gif.


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Caelumamittendum
post Jun 1 2017, 02:11 PM
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I think my Presonus card came with some sort of limited copy. I never checked it out though. I wonder how it compares to Reaper.


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 4 2017, 06:14 PM
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IT's a very powerful daw now that it can take standard plugins. The first version was a bit limited in that it didn't like standard plugins if I remember correctly. It integrates very well with the PRESONUS hardware in particular. However, if you are doing well with Reaper, I don't think I'd suggest a switch just for giggles.

However, there is a version of PRO TOOLS, that is now FREE, called PRO TOOLS FIRST. MANY Pro studios still use Pro Tools, so being able to use it to some degree can only enhance one's ability and flexibility as a recording musician/producer. Not saying switch and give up reaper, but as it's free it's worth a download and perhaps do a few small projects with it to get familiar with the interface. I'd suggest this for everyone, PC/MAC, new to DAW, Experienced, everyone.

http://www.avid.com/pro-tools-first

Todd




QUOTE (Caelumamittendum @ Jun 1 2017, 09:11 AM) *
I think my Presonus card came with some sort of limited copy. I never checked it out though. I wonder how it compares to Reaper.


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