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> The Ultimate Guide To A Multi-computer Kontakt Composer Setup
Mertay
post Jun 4 2017, 06:20 PM
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For those interested in computer tech for music, this is a very nice watch;



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Sensible Jones
post Jun 5 2017, 01:41 PM
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Interesting stuff!!
I've watched a few of his Vids before!
Thanks for posting Mertay!!


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Gabriel Leopardi
post Jun 5 2017, 01:53 PM
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Very interesting. Thanks for sharing mate.


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Todd Simpson
post Jun 5 2017, 09:36 PM
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It seems like doing it this way introduces latency? For performing live input, it seems there is no way around it? I have not worked with huge scores needing hundreds of tracks of symphonic plugins before, so I'm out of my depth here. If the primary host machine has enough ram, a quad i7 cpu and a large SSD drive, couldn't one just load everything needed locally or does that just not work due to overburdening the primary host?

I found this vid where he talks about using LOGIC X with Vienna Symphony and he talks about using 2 buffers, in addition to the primary, so tripling the amount of latency on input from a given midi source. That much latency would drive me nuts. Have you worked on a rig with this type of setup? is it common for large scores?



something tells me RAMMIKIN will know something about all this smile.gif

Todd


QUOTE (Mertay @ Jun 4 2017, 01:20 PM) *
For those interested in computer tech for music, this is a very nice watch;



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Mertay
post Jun 5 2017, 10:22 PM
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If you mean the composing process, classical composers work very different.

They only play piano when composing and then do the orchestration based on that piano score. I used to use sibelius, first made the score for musicians then a version for the refined computer playback.

Its possible guys like these (when working for someone else) take only midi files generated from programs like sibelius then work on the midi in logic etc. to make it sound more real to be used on a soundtrack etc.


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Rammikin
post Jun 5 2017, 11:15 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Jun 5 2017, 08:36 PM) *
something tells me RAMMIKIN will know something about all this smile.gif


Yeah, we've got a fair number of customers who work this way (including David, who is an Omnisphere user). There are two problems the Vienna Ensemble Pro rig is intended to solve. The first is the amount of RAM and CPU on a single machine. By using a farm of machines, each hosting virtual synths, you can spread the load so you have more total horsepower available. VEP can be set up so the latency is compensated when playing back and it syncs up quite well.

The bigger problem though, is many composers work with a huge template consisting of many large sample-based virtual instruments. Most of the projects they work on use this same set of virtual synths and samples. People who work on movie trailers and video game scores especially work this way. Loading up a large session file into your DAW many times a day as you switch from project to project can eat up a lot of time. With VEP you can have those virtual instruments standing by, loaded into memory and set up with the samples you use in your template. That way switching to a new project, or even starting a new one, doesn't have to spend time loading the instruments and samples. It's a real time-saver.




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