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> Green Screening/lighting For Video
Doug Lane
post Aug 3 2017, 06:55 AM
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Hi guys!

First off, just for fun, I'd like to open this post up with a little bit of guitar porn. I've added a few S I C C guitars to my collection!


I've been working a lot on content creation for my YouTube channel, getting serious about recording and edition video for the first time. A lot of my stuff is based around doing metal covers for video game OSTs, and I've found that green screening is a great way to free up a lot of the on-screen space so that I can include larger clips of gameplay footage to go alongside my playing. I am, however, having some difficulty getting consistent results with chromakey. Does anyone have any tips or guides on how to properly do green screen and lighting setups the right way? I'm trying to avoid developing bad habits that will hamstring my video production later on.

Additionally, I'm finding that when I layer myself over other videos, my top layer videos are coming through as transparent. I'm using Sony Vegas 14, if anyone knows more about this. below is an example of what I'm talking about.



This post has been edited by Doug Lane: Aug 3 2017, 07:01 AM


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Darius Wave
post Aug 3 2017, 10:53 AM
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For greenscreen you need to:

1. Match your clothes - best to dress in contrast colors. Often it's great to wear something dark with your forearms covered. Otherwise green background can reflect on your hands and you'll have problems making good chroma separation

2. Even lightening. Better to use sofboxes or less expensive umberellas - white but no reflecting (silver coat), rather those transparent white for softening the light. If reduces amount of shadows and makes the light split more even on the whole "screen"

That's all you can do if you don't want to dedicate one, whole room just for a green screen. Professional way of doing this cointains multiple lights, separately for you and for the background. Also the distance from the background has to be huge so it all really takes a lot of place/room.


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Todd Simpson
post Aug 3 2017, 04:49 PM
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IF you are using green screen keying, then you could be making the image of you a bit see through during the keying process. Move to a spot in the timeline where you have a greenscreen shot and a background image then adjust the settings used for green screening until the image of you is more solid. I don't use vegas but I'm sure there are keying tips a plenty on youtube.

Assuming I'm getting what your asking of course smile.gif

Also, plenty of youtube tutorials on home lighting for green screen using cheap lights from hardware stores. Darius is spot on when he says it's best to use more than one light. Putting a light behind you to create a "rim light" around you eases the keying process as it gives you a better edge to work with.

The reason you don't notice the see through bits against a black back ground in your timeline is that it's just going to black, if you are wearing a black shirt, black guitar, it will look fine. But if your keying is off, any image behind it will show through.

Hope this helps wink.gif

Todd

QUOTE (Doug Lane @ Aug 3 2017, 01:55 AM) *
Hi guys!

First off, just for fun, I'd like to open this post up with a little bit of guitar porn. I've added a few S I C C guitars to my collection!


I've been working a lot on content creation for my YouTube channel, getting serious about recording and edition video for the first time. A lot of my stuff is based around doing metal covers for video game OSTs, and I've found that green screening is a great way to free up a lot of the on-screen space so that I can include larger clips of gameplay footage to go alongside my playing. I am, however, having some difficulty getting consistent results with chromakey. Does anyone have any tips or guides on how to properly do green screen and lighting setups the right way? I'm trying to avoid developing bad habits that will hamstring my video production later on.

Additionally, I'm finding that when I layer myself over other videos, my top layer videos are coming through as transparent. I'm using Sony Vegas 14, if anyone knows more about this. below is an example of what I'm talking about.




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