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> Rack Limiters In Processors
Mertay
post Sep 19 2017, 11:15 PM
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I messed with a rack limiter inside a processor a bit today. I believe they are offered in many processors these days (?)

First I tried the traditional way, at the very end of the chain. It helped glueing the guitar to the backing track a bit more (softening the harshness) but also hyped fx like the reverb a bit. Not much for the beginner as this tends to need some mixing skills and plug-ins can be better...

Then I tried at the begining of the chain which was interesting. With almost fastest attack, fast release and minimal ratio it very transparently increased the sustain of the guitar. More transparent than a compressor pedal as compressors tend to characterize pick attacks. Overall the tone felt a bit more "expensive" smile.gif

Finally I activated my analog overdrive (placed before the processor). The processors amp was set to almost clean, it took away the thinness of the overdrive making the tone closer to an amp feel. Just keep the ratio minimal to keep the noise low when testing, the aim is always adding a little spice to the sound rather than a very noticable change.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Sep 19 2017, 11:17 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Sep 20 2017, 05:19 AM
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The good news is that you can get wads of plugin limiters for free these days from bedroom producers blog and many other places, and place then any where in the chain and experiment with just a couple of clicks smile.gif Some of the coolest tones are often found by just throwing things at your signal and messing about a bit with plugins in different ways.


QUOTE (Mertay @ Sep 19 2017, 06:15 PM) *
I messed with a rack limiter inside a processor a bit today. I believe they are offered in many processors these days (?)

First I tried the traditional way, at the very end of the chain. It helped glueing the guitar to the backing track a bit more (softening the harshness) but also hyped fx like the reverb a bit. Not much for the beginner as this tends to need some mixing skills and plug-ins can be better...

Then I tried at the begining of the chain which was interesting. With almost fastest attack, fast release and minimal ratio it very transparently increased the sustain of the guitar. More transparent than a compressor pedal as compressors tend to characterize pick attacks. Overall the tone felt a bit more "expensive" smile.gif

Finally I activated my analog overdrive (placed before the processor). The processors amp was set to almost clean, it took away the thinness of the overdrive making the tone closer to an amp feel. Just keep the ratio minimal to keep the noise low when testing, the aim is always adding a little spice to the sound rather than a very noticable change.



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Mertay
post Sep 20 2017, 09:41 AM
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I guess the engineer side of me prevented using different places in the chain for so long, as I'm also not very keen on using compressor/limiters when mixing. I used to use a compressor as a boost many years ago but after digging OD's didn't think about them much (although must add a limiter feels very different to me than a compressor).

Placing one in the beginning of the chain seems to really help software amps, giving a bit more life to its thin character (as I use a cheapo processor).

This post has been edited by Mertay: Sep 20 2017, 09:42 AM


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Todd Simpson
post Sep 22 2017, 09:28 PM
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Bingo smile.gif The key to making guitar plugins sound a bit better is often using something in front of them to help push the input just a bit to make them sound more like an actual amp. It can be over done of course, but I've found more often than not, folks that don't like what they are getting from their guitar plugin are usually having a lack of input dynamics resulting in a thinner/flatter sound.

Todd
QUOTE (Mertay @ Sep 20 2017, 04:41 AM) *
I guess the engineer side of me prevented using different places in the chain for so long, as I'm also not very keen on using compressor/limiters when mixing. I used to use a compressor as a boost many years ago but after digging OD's didn't think about them much (although must add a limiter feels very different to me than a compressor).

Placing one in the beginning of the chain seems to really help software amps, giving a bit more life to its thin character (as I use a cheapo processor).



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