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> Before Gig'ing With A Processor...
Mertay
post Oct 20 2017, 09:55 PM
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Some kid I've met got a zoom processor recently, specifically for gig'ing. He told me he designed the tones with his guitar teacher (who runs a studio where the tones were made) but when he started playing in the soundcheck the sounds were terrible.

So here's the main difference between a processor (mid priced ones I've experienced) and plug-ins, the processors have extra eq's on the end of the chain.

There might be a few reasons why the tone you create at home not being the same on stage, like your listening levels while adjusting tones or the stage speakers not naturally sound like you studio monitors...the worst part is most likely the guy behind the mixer won't have the experience to fix the problem. Even a friend of mine who's a professional once admitted to me he hated working with processors as he's so much more comfortable dealing with mic.ing amps.

This is why the processor has an extra eq. , but probably the most useful one is the high-cut. Visually it looks like this;



By moveing its freq. location (to left or right visually), you solve problems like thinnes/harshness or mud. cause it shaves off the high freq.s . There can be extra filters like to adjust bass or mid.s, but this is the filter you probably should reach first.

Now give it a try but remember this golden rule, when changing the adjustment always adjust the output too! so if you're lessening the highs to get a fatter sound, the volume will drop so immediatly increase it. This will prevent you from over-using it.

This post has been edited by Mertay: Oct 20 2017, 09:56 PM


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 21 2017, 03:06 AM
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Good point smile.gif Using a Processsor and going direct can be handy! But it takes a bit of getting used to. Especially if the guy running the house audio isn't used to it. If the guy running audio gives you a funny look when you say you wanna run direct to the console from your processor, you may be better served by using a power amp and small guitar cab or just even a combo amp, that he can mic up like he is used to doing. Carrying a small combo camp around, is always a good idea imho, if you are gigging. If it's got a clean and a dirty channel, and some reverb, you can get by even if your main processor explodes, or gets stolen etc. Also, you can run your processor to your combo amp on the clean channel so the sound guy can just stick an sm57 on it and keep things moving smile.gif As they say in the I.T. industry, A.H.A.B. (Always Have a Backup)

Todd



QUOTE (Mertay @ Oct 20 2017, 04:55 PM) *
Some kid I've met got a zoom processor recently, specifically for gig'ing. He told me he designed the tones with his guitar teacher (who runs a studio where the tones were made) but when he started playing in the soundcheck the sounds were terrible.

So here's the main difference between a processor (mid priced ones I've experienced) and plug-ins, the processors have extra eq's on the end of the chain.

There might be a few reasons why the tone you create at home not being the same on stage, like your listening levels while adjusting tones or the stage speakers not naturally sound like you studio monitors...the worst part is most likely the guy behind the mixer won't have the experience to fix the problem. Even a friend of mine who's a professional once admitted to me he hated working with processors as he's so much more comfortable dealing with mic.ing amps.

This is why the processor has an extra eq. , but probably the most useful one is the high-cut. Visually it looks like this;



By moveing its freq. location (to left or right visually), you solve problems like thinnes/harshness or mud. cause it shaves off the high freq.s . There can be extra filters like to adjust bass or mid.s, but this is the filter you probably should reach first.

Now give it a try but remember this golden rule, when changing the adjustment always adjust the output too! so if you're lessening the highs to get a fatter sound, the volume will drop so immediatly increase it. This will prevent you from over-using it.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Oct 21 2017, 03:07 AM


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klasaine
post Oct 21 2017, 03:56 PM
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The same problems arise when using an old fashioned amp and effects pedals too.
You definitely shouldn't expect to set your analog tones in a guitar lesson and then expect those to work at a show.


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Todd Simpson
post Oct 21 2017, 06:04 PM
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A very good point indeed. It may seem counterintuitive. If you have not played live yet, you are in for a shock when you get you rig on stage, at stage volume, and just listen. You may find yourself heading to your rig and tweaking like mad. Just takes a bit tto get used to is ll smile.gif

Todd

QUOTE (klasaine @ Oct 21 2017, 10:56 AM) *
The same problems arise when using an old fashioned amp and effects pedals too.
You definitely shouldn't expect to set your analog tones in a guitar lesson and then expect those to work at a show.



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klasaine
post Oct 21 2017, 06:55 PM
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As a real world example I'll offer this anecdote ...

I play with a band that has been gigging at one particular venue for 4 years. We play there on average once every 6 weeks. I use the same rig every time, the band members don't change and even the sound guys are the same. I still have to tweak a pedal or two and my amp slightly every time I play there.

There are a ton of factors that that go into your final tone. On a 'live' gig many of those factors have nothing to do with your rig. Club crowd density, club temperature and humidity level, is there a new piece of carpet on the floor?, did a piece of carpet come up?, how consistent is the AC coming in to the venue?, is there a new appliance getting turned on?, how old are your strings?, different guitar cable maybe? and on and on.


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Mertay
post Oct 22 2017, 02:56 PM
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Another cool reply from Klasaine smile.gif

I remembered when I was 16-17 our school band entered a contest held between other schools. I didn't take my amp there (only processor, but it was working fine with schools mixer...) and naturally the tone didn't translate.

But only 1 song was given for sound testing so I had no time to adjust anything on stage. My school teacher asked the guys behind the mixer what could be done and best they could do was give me a headphone they were using. To my luck when adjusted from that headphone it worked smile.gif but thinking today, that was pure luck biggrin.gif


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