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> Strings 8s Vs 12s
Tom51
post Dec 6 2017, 10:27 AM
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What made post this video is the many great players that were mentioned in the beginning the used so light strings (8s or even 7s). Wow.

As I personally ended up on a Les Paul and sold my Strat and PRS I am fine with a strings size of 10-46 as it feels precise and comfortable.
Anyone using or tried 8s or 7s too? And how does it work for you?

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Mertay
post Dec 6 2017, 01:09 PM
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10s are most popular as far as I noticed around me. I've used them for a long time too but prefer a softer touch so 9's work for me.

When changing string gaunge one must keep in mind his preference of pick might change too.


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MonkeyDAthos
post Dec 6 2017, 11:40 PM
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Actually I change from 010 to 09 depending on the season.
From late fall until early spring, I usually run a set of 09 standard mainly because my fingers get a bit cranky with the cold temperature. But normally I am 010 guy.

That being said a few years ago our rehearsal room had a boiler (think that's how you call it in english) so the temperature was always pretty high even in the winter. To the point where 010 felt like 08 to me. So I decided to try 011 on my SG (standard tunning) and it sounded really really good I was extremely surprised and pleased with results.





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Todd Simpson
post Dec 7 2017, 02:27 AM
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I"ve tried every gauge and brand you can imagine. I ended up with the Yngwie .08 set on my main axe. They are just the most expressive strings available imho. Some folks feel that thicker strings give them heavier tone. I"ve always found that tone comes from my hands, not from my strings. But that's just me. In the end, you'll just have to try a bunch of different things til you fine what you like smile.gif

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QUOTE (Tom51 @ Dec 6 2017, 05:27 AM) *
What made post this video is the many great players that were mentioned in the beginning the used so light strings (8s or even 7s). Wow.

As I personally ended up on a Les Paul and sold my Strat and PRS I am fine with a strings size of 10-46 as it feels precise and comfortable.
Anyone using or tried 8s or 7s too? And how does it work for you?




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Tom51
post Dec 7 2017, 09:47 AM
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QUOTE (MonkeyDAthos @ Dec 6 2017, 10:40 PM) *
Actually I change from 010 to 09 depending on the season.
From late fall until early spring, I usually run a set of 09 standard mainly because my fingers get a bit cranky with the cold temperature. But normally I am 010 guy.


Never thought of this. Interesting.


QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Dec 7 2017, 01:27 AM) *
I"ve tried every gauge and brand you can imagine. I ended up with the Yngwie .08 set on my main axe. They are just the most expressive strings available imho. Some folks feel that thicker strings give them heavier tone. I"ve always found that tone comes from my hands, not from my strings. But that's just me. In the end, you'll just have to try a bunch of different things til you fine what you like smile.gif

Todd


Ha..., and I would have thought with your big tasty tone you play at least 11s Todd!

I was hesitating to change to lighter strings as I would expect a full new guitar setup from intonation to neck once I change from 10s to 8s. Still searching for a single coil guitar that really wants me - maybe here I will go to lighter strings which will make bends and phrasing easier. String tension here is often higher. Is that only related to scale length or also to the angle the string crosses nut and brigde?

This post has been edited by Tom51: Dec 7 2017, 09:49 AM
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Sensible Jones
post Dec 7 2017, 02:43 PM
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I mainly use 10-46 too, I have a couple of Strats with 11-52 in Eb tuning too. Tried 12's but found them just a bit too heavy for me.
When I first started learning I used Ernie Ball 8's on everything! I did try a set of the Billy Gibbons 7's a while back, they lasted about a half hour before I took them off again!!
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PosterBoy
post Dec 7 2017, 08:29 PM
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I've Flatwound 12s on my Epiphone Dot, 11s on my Burny LP, 10's on my Tyler Burning Water and 9s on my RG and Tele.

My acoustics, 13s on my Bourgeois Slope D and 12s on my Martin D42 copy


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 8 2017, 02:46 AM
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Well thanks! Yeah, the blue Ibby with yellow pups is strung with Yngwie .08 gauge (I can't find them anymore). Had to rebalance the trem but it's a zero trem so there is a handy little rotator knob on bottom of the axe that you can easily adjust. Like I said, tone comes from your hands, not your strings smile.gif

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QUOTE (Tom51 @ Dec 7 2017, 04:47 AM) *
Never thought of this. Interesting.




Ha..., and I would have thought with your big tasty tone you play at least 11s Todd!

I was hesitating to change to lighter strings as I would expect a full new guitar setup from intonation to neck once I change from 10s to 8s. Still searching for a single coil guitar that really wants me - maybe here I will go to lighter strings which will make bends and phrasing easier. String tension here is often higher. Is that only related to scale length or also to the angle the string crosses nut and brigde?



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Phil66
post Dec 9 2017, 10:21 AM
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I use 10s on all of my electrics but I really want to buy a USA Sunburst Strat and have it set up with 15s just for the hell of it as my little piece of SRV smile.gif


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AK Rich
post Dec 10 2017, 04:02 AM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 9 2017, 01:21 AM) *
I use 10s on all of my electrics but I really want to buy a USA Sunburst Strat and have it set up with 15s just for the hell of it as my little piece of SRV smile.gif

And there will be hell trying to play those big ol' fat strings. biggrin.gif SRV used strings like that more because he had to rather than because he wanted to because of his playing style in my view. Just a theory. (He played very hard and needed the bigger strings to keep from breaking them all the time). Rumor has it he went as big as 18-72 at one point (which just seems nutty to me but whatever, who knows?) but most commonly 13-52 or 11's in his latter years.
I have tried a bunch of different brands and gauges over the years but I always end up going back to the pink packs of Super Slinky's. For me, that's what works best.

This post has been edited by AK Rich: Dec 10 2017, 04:31 AM
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Phil66
post Dec 10 2017, 06:24 PM
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Interesting. It would be good for training the muscles in the hands/fingers though wink.gif


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klasaine
post Dec 10 2017, 06:29 PM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 10 2017, 10:24 AM) *
Interesting. It would be good for training the muscles in the hands/fingers though wink.gif


You can actually fuck your hands and wrists up pretty good if you play too hard (a lot of bending) on a set of 13s or bigger.
SRV just didn't live long enough for that to happen. He also tuned down a 1/2 step.

Playing on big strings doesn't help your technique. It's not about strength, it's about control.


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Sensible Jones
post Dec 10 2017, 08:22 PM
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QUOTE (klasaine @ Dec 10 2017, 06:29 PM) *
Playing on big strings doesn't help your technique. It's not about strength, it's about control.

Amen Ken!!!
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Phil66
post Dec 10 2017, 08:52 PM
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Don't you need strength to be able to control though?

I always find that if I play the acoustic for a while the electric with 10s on after that feels so easy.


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klasaine
post Dec 10 2017, 09:48 PM
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You only need to build up your strength in the beginning or after an injury or if you've stopped playing completely for several months/years. After you've played consistently for a couple of years, your hands aren't getting any stronger and they are strong enough. Strong enough to stretch a piece of skinny wire a couple of centimeters. Yeah, playing a steel string for a couple of hours and then switching to an electric with 10s or 9s on it will of course 'feel' easier but really, when you switch, are you playing 'better'?

I'm an .11 gauge player on my solid bodies. Not super heavy but def not 'light'. I like .12s on my steel string and my jazz archtop.
The reason I like the heavier gauges is because of the resistance in my right (picking) hand. I can bend the shit out a set of 11s or 12s. My hand is as strong as it's gonna get. It has been since I was probably 19. Speed, accuracy, groove, shifting, etc. - that's the hard stuff.

This post has been edited by klasaine: Dec 10 2017, 10:16 PM


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Phil66
post Dec 10 2017, 10:15 PM
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A good point well made Ken.

Thank you smile.gif


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