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> How Long To Get Consistency
PosterBoy
post Dec 28 2017, 12:47 PM
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Ok so we all know. Start off slowly and bump the speed up once you can play it 3 or 4 times in a row without making a mistake.

I'm still trying to get through the 5 pentatonic shapes and 7 positions of 3 nps scales without making a mistake.

I've also noticed with the mandolin trying to get fiddle tunes down without a mistake is proving almost impossible.

Are my fingers just not doing as they are told? Is there something I'm missing when I practice? Is there a better way?

I'll never get up to speed in this lifetime at this rate.

I do think I spend too much time improvising, rather than playing/practicing set pieces which might be part of the issue. Even so there is still a fair amount of time working on scales and triads etc


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Phil66
post Dec 28 2017, 01:02 PM
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Great question, looking forward to the answers as I too think the same. I often wonder if my mind communicates properly with my fingers.
I find that I can increase speed in one lick or scale but it doesn't necessarily help other licks or scales because of different fingerings.
It seems, for me anyway, that skills seem to get pigeonholed into that particular lick or scale whereas I need a more overall skill set improvement.

I hope this makes sense and add something to this thread smile.gif


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PosterBoy
post Dec 28 2017, 01:13 PM
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I totally get you, I have found through so much practice of scales and scale sequences in 8th notes that's what my playing tends towards.

Since working on triads that has at least helped me move around the neck more and hitting chord tones at the right time.

Still mixing up 8th notes 16th notes and triplets etc to make my phrasing more interesting is something I really need to do.


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jstcrsn
post Dec 28 2017, 01:51 PM
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QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 28 2017, 01:02 PM) *
Great question, looking forward to the answers as I too think the same. I often wonder if my mind communicates properly with my fingers.
I find that I can increase speed in one lick or scale but it doesn't necessarily help other licks or scales because of different fingerings.
It seems, for me anyway, that skills seem to get pigeonholed into that particular lick or scale whereas I need a more overall skill set improvement.

I hope this makes sense and add something to this thread smile.gif

its more about getting it programmed " correctly " in your mind , than it is playing with a metronome (the metronome is just supposed to help in getting it correct ). I have found speed comes much quicker once it is programmed . This is why some licks go quick and others don't . And of course the more different licks are programmed the quicker new licks get up to speed as there is commonality that gets programmed .

It took me time , and I had to fall in love with perfection before I got speed .

This is what I would suggest , find a lick that you can play really good( without the metronome)and it does not have to be as fast as you can play it, find a 30 minute show on TV and just play that lick at that speed for 30 every day for a week and tell me what happened . If it is about programming your brain , like a computer it can be given to much info which causes it to slow , so don't overload your brain
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Todd Simpson
post Dec 28 2017, 09:18 PM
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It's entirely natural imho smile.gif One method I've used is almost "passive practice" which I've talked about before. Basically learn a pattern til you can play it without looking. Then during tv/movie time, pull out the guitar, without an amp, and just loop the sequence while you watch. Just sheer repetition without thinking about it. In no time, you'll be playing the sequence almost without thinking about it.

As for 8th notes, they are sort of the "middle range" of timing sequences. Once you get the hang of them, it's a good idea to learn to do what you are heading for which is adding triplets and throwing in timing variations such as long single notes with bends/vibrato, and 16th note runs. Once you can play in a precise/even fashion with 8th notes, it's time to start playing faster and slower around them. I use quite a bit of 8th note sections in many of my solos to establish a tempo that I can then play with and against. smile.gif

This weeks Quick Licks using a roughly 8th note timing but does it in mostly triplets ending wth a single note vibrato. Sort of everything I just talked about in one lick.



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QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Dec 28 2017, 08:13 AM) *
I totally get you, I have found through so much practice of scales and scale sequences in 8th notes that's what my playing tends towards.

Since working on triads that has at least helped me move around the neck more and hitting chord tones at the right time.

Still mixing up 8th notes 16th notes and triplets etc to make my phrasing more interesting is something I really need to do.


This post has been edited by Todd Simpson: Dec 28 2017, 09:21 PM


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Phil66
post Dec 28 2017, 09:58 PM
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QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Dec 28 2017, 08:18 PM) *
Then during tv/movie time, pull out the guitar, without an amp, and just loop the sequence while you watch. Just sheer repetition without thinking about it. In no time, you'll be playing the sequence almost without thinking about it.

Todd


And in no time my wife will be going insane from hearing the same lick over and over laugh.gif But seriously what I'm saying is, and I think Posterboy is saying, is that we can only see result per lick/sequence, it doesn't seem to transcend across everything.

Cheers


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Todd Simpson
post Dec 31 2017, 03:30 AM
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Now I get ya! In that case, I'd suggest using any lick/chop etc. asap in context. E.G. Pick a key and find a backing track to make it work as a solo lick. Pick a different key than you learned it in. Get practice transposing the lick, which is not hard to to, just move your hand to the new root position. Then use the lick with music. After all, that's the point of learning the licks imho, to play them in a musical context. so yeah, as soon as you get a lick, play it in a solo with a backing. Make it in to something
that works for you in your "bag of tricks" smile.gif!

I also just noticed that crsn and I were sorta saying the same thing about passive practice, but that's not really what
you are asking about.

Todd


QUOTE (Phil66 @ Dec 28 2017, 04:58 PM) *
And in no time my wife will be going insane from hearing the same lick over and over laugh.gif But seriously what I'm saying is, and I think Posterboy is saying, is that we can only see result per lick/sequence, it doesn't seem to transcend across everything.

Cheers



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