Using Reverb In Your Mix
Todd Simpson
May 11 2020, 08:38 PM
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REVERB is an important part of any mix. A great way to use it is to "bus" your tracks to a new channel where you place a reverb. You can set several tracks up depending on your tracks. Here's a cool vid on it. Do you guys use reverb like this or Per Track?

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Mertay
May 11 2020, 10:27 PM
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It's a nice vid.

Most engineers are fond of specific tool as a personal thing, some are reverb junkie's smile.gif I never got the point of having 10's of reverb plug-ins but do appreciate almost all sound different from one another, sometimes in detail and sometimes obvious.

Using send's was a must in analog and early computer days cause of reverb problems, to me even the whole 80's overall wet sound is connected to that. I remember using sends being a bit tricky for me as they affected the levels of tracks during adjusting stuff.

Since we have more power for a while now, I tend to place them in groups (I group everything, makes the visual and adding overall fx much faster and tidier). Its rare I guess I insert on an individual track.

But my personal tip is in individual track then go for an impulse reverb, for group algorithmic. Very personal comment but to me impulse reverbs tend to make things boxy if the material is dense (or routed to a lot of material), for solo stuff though can be very sweet sounding.

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Todd Simpson
May 12 2020, 01:45 AM
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very good point. Using an impulse reverb on a very complicated track can keep it from blurring together for a start. Many folks have a computer that can use a reverb on every track and not lose playback performance. The bus method has similarities to using an actual patch bay back in the day when a studio might have only 4 rack reverb units and every track gets a knob that can send it to one of those reverbs when patched. It's possible now to have a laptop with 24 tracks each with their own reverb plugin on a different setting.

It's important to experiment as everyone can find their own way based on what their ears tell them. It's a great time to experiment. It's not like we have to buy rack reverb units at a thousand dollars each and and attach them to a patch bay anymore. I must say I dont miss that part of it smile.gif

QUOTE (Mertay @ May 11 2020, 05:27 PM) *
It's a nice vid.

Most engineers are fond of specific tool as a personal thing, some are reverb junkie's smile.gif I never got the point of having 10's of reverb plug-ins but do appreciate almost all sound different from one another, sometimes in detail and sometimes obvious.

Using send's was a must in analog and early computer days cause of reverb problems, to me even the whole 80's overall wet sound is connected to that. I remember using sends being a bit tricky for me as they affected the levels of tracks during adjusting stuff.

Since we have more power for a while now, I tend to place them in groups (I group everything, makes the visual and adding overall fx much faster and tidier). Its rare I guess I insert on an individual track.

But my personal tip is in individual track then go for an impulse reverb, for group algorithmic. Very personal comment but to me impulse reverbs tend to make things boxy if the material is dense (or routed to a lot of material), for solo stuff though can be very sweet sounding.

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Kristofer Dahl
May 13 2020, 09:44 AM
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Yes I almost always bus reverbs. It makes a lot of sense since many times you want to apply the exact same reverbs to several different tracks in order to make them blend - and also is saves a lot of processing power.

Also I have come to realise that a reverb is so much more than you usual hall/spring go to.

Short reverbs are extremely powerful tone shaping tools, and can be stacked just as you would add several EQ and gain shapers.

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Todd Simpson
May 13 2020, 08:11 PM
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Well said! Reverb can be a key part of overall tone on a given track. For example, adding a bit of ROOM reverb is a quick way to give a guitar solo a bit of an EIGHTIES vibe as it was used quite a bit back in the day. Reverb is a great way to put your own tone stamp on a track.

QUOTE (Kristofer Dahl @ May 13 2020, 04:44 AM) *
Short reverbs are extremely powerful tone shaping tools, and can be stacked just as you would add several EQ and gain shapers.

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