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> Really Down...need Some Advice
mattacuk
post Sep 2 2007, 07:20 PM
Post #21


Lets go fishing!
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Im 26 and im going to be a great guitarist ! biggrin.gif


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"The Fundimental Difference between Paul Gilbert and Buckethead is that Paul Explores the Good side of the force, while Buckethead Explores the Dark Side of the Force" :)
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Gen
post Sep 2 2007, 07:34 PM
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Noodle of offspring started at the age of 22.
Okay its not a shredder but its still a really good guitarist imo.


--------------------
"Fact is, nothing in the world bores me more than gear...If I played thru your rig, I would still sound like me. Van Halen would sound like Van Halen. Brian May...etc. Very early in my career I decided to focus on creating music and not being a guitar tech. Being a good guitar tech is a very different and extremely difficult job, so why not leave it to a pro?"

Marty Friedman -

Guitars: ESP LTD viper-500, a fake strat and an acoustic guitar( dont know the brand)
Amp: Randall RX20R
Effects: Boss mt 2 distortion pedal, Line 6 pod floor plus
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FretDancer69
post Sep 3 2007, 12:23 AM
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QUOTE (Ayen @ Sep 2 2007, 09:33 AM) *


The best thing to do is ignore them, work at your technique as best you can, and when the time comes and you're famous, playing lead (or whatever you prefer to play) in a rock band, when they come up to you, asking for forgiveness, either bash 'em in the head with your guitar, or ignore them entirely.

Anyone here has the ability to become famous and amazing if they work hard towards it. A good example here is Kristofer. I don't know if he was told he couldn't make it, but at one point he was nothing more than a newbie like the rest of us. Now look at him, through hard work he owns GMC, has been in many bands, and is an amazing guitarist. One day you'll be amazing, ignore anyone who puts you down.

Another suggestion that came to me, if someone tells you you can't do something on the guitar, whether it be extremely hard or you're having an off day, hand them the guitar, give them the pick, and tell them to play something. That'll show them.



great words Ayen. I completely agree with you.


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NightFlight
post Sep 3 2007, 01:27 AM
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There was this kid I knew a while back. At the age of 7, his mother bought him one of those little chord organs. Within a few months, this kid learned all the notes on the keyboard and could play everything in the songbooks -- in fact, he was pretty much reading music. By the time he was 10, he started learning wind instruments at school in beginning band. And that same year he got his first guitar and started learning from various beginner books. From then on, he played in school band (concert band, symphonic band, jazz band) until he graduated high school while still learning and playing guitar. Over the span of 8 years until graduation, this kid had learned clarinet, trumpet, sax, baritone, French horn, and was even writing entire scores for symphonic band during his senior year in high school. And yes, he was still jamming away at guitar. At age 17, he became a forming member of a local club band and played regular gigs. As high school graduation approached, he had a clear, concise vision of what he wanted to do with his life ---- he wanted to be a musician and a music teacher. It was the obvious choice since music was what he had known most of his life. Beside, his parents had more or less helped foster this passion from day one.

In quest of his dream, he proceeded to check out several U.S. colleges with well-known music programs. There were a few prospects, including Berkeley. But of course, someone had to slap him back into reality. His parents and other family members reminded him what a waste of time and life it would be to get a music degree -- this was not a respectable career, there was no money to be made in it, there are no jobs for people with music degrees....and so on.

Of course we all tend to trust our close family members, right? After all, those of us that have kids would like to think we are steering them in the right direction. So, this kid took their advice and sought out other options for his life. He still played his axe, gigged with his band -- until several of the band memebers moved on. Two members went to music conservatories, one hooked up with a touring band and hit the road. Within two years the band more or less dissolved. Meanwhile, over the next 20 years, this kid (now an adult) bounced around exploring different career options, trying to figure it all out -- who he was and what he was supposed to do with his life. Throughout this time, he was off and on again with his guitar. Besides, he no longer had the time to devote to getting serious about playing guitar. All along he felt like something in his life was missing. Music -- the very thing that defined him, gave birth to his soul, his lifelong ambitions and dreams -- had been trampled, dismissed, dismantled and buried in a sea of self-doubt.

This kid....was me. In a few months I'll be 42 years old. Not a day in my life passes that I don't regret not following my dream. In spite of having two college degrees, a personally rewarding career that pays quite well, a wife, kids, two dogs, a cat, a koi pond, a nice home, etc. -- there is still an empty, unfilled void from a long lost dream.

Take a bit of advice from an old man -- don't EVER let anyone crush your goals and destroy your dreams. This doesn't mean you cannot listen to what other people have to say. There's always something to be learned, even if you think their ideas are a load of crap. You can always listen, smile, and say, "I appreciate your concern" -- then go grab your axe and rip off a few shreds to vent. The key is to know who you are, what you want, and have the self-discipline to dedicate yourself to it. The only difference between those that are great and those that linger in mediocrity is quite simple: the ones that make it to the top are the ones that are willing to work the hardest, sacrifice the most, and never stop striving toward their goals. In the end, you may or may not get exactly where you want to be -- but you can be assured you will achieve something great that you will always cherish.

One thing I must add here is that everything in life MUST have a balance. Sacrificing your education to jam on the guitar all day is definitely not going to enable you to reach your goals. Many, if not most, of the great guitarists -- those that we look to emulate and learn from here at GMC, are quite intelligent. Ever listen to these guys in an interview? By their musical talent it's quite clear they paid their dues and put forth the greatest of effort in their craft. However, in listening to their interviews it is also clear they have a broader knowledge base than that limited to grinding an axe or belting out bone-chilling vocals. Learn everything you can, from every experience, every day of your life and you will go far.

As for me, I may be an old man but I'm not that old. Through hard work, dedication, and the incredible learning experiences here at GMC, I'm going to get back to and beyond the performance-level player I used to be. I WILL get back on that stage! When the lights go down, and the amps crank up -- you can know one thing for sure....it's gonna freakin' ROCK!

Now, grab your guitar, tune up, crank it out, and never say die to your dreams! Peace! cool.gif


--------------------
"Time is a great teacher. Unfortunately, it kills all it's students."

My Toys
Gibson Les Paul Custom
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster
Marshall JCM 800 Lead Series
Boss GT-6 Processor
...and other stuff. :-)
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Gen
post Sep 3 2007, 01:38 AM
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QUOTE (NightFlight @ Sep 3 2007, 02:27 AM) *
There was this kid I knew a while back. At the age of 7, his mother bought him one of those little chord organs. Within a few months, this kid learned all the notes on the keyboard and could play everything in the songbooks -- in fact, he was pretty much reading music. By the time he was 10, he started learning wind instruments at school in beginning band. And that same year he got his first guitar and started learning from various beginner books. From then on, he played in school band (concert band, symphonic band, jazz band) until he graduated high school while still learning and playing guitar. Over the span of 8 years until graduation, this kid had learned clarinet, trumpet, sax, baritone, French horn, and was even writing entire scores for symphonic band during his senior year in high school. And yes, he was still jamming away at guitar. At age 17, he became a forming member of a local club band and played regular gigs. As high school graduation approached, he had a clear, concise vision of what he wanted to do with his life ---- he wanted to be a musician and a music teacher. It was the obvious choice since music was what he had known most of his life. Beside, his parents had more or less helped foster this passion from day one.

In quest of his dream, he proceeded to check out several U.S. colleges with well-known music programs. There were a few prospects, including Berkeley. But of course, someone had to slap him back into reality. His parents and other family members reminded him what a waste of time and life it would be to get a music degree -- this was not a respectable career, there was no money to be made in it, there are no jobs for people with music degrees....and so on.

Of course we all tend to trust our close family members, right? After all, those of us that have kids would like to think we are steering them in the right direction. So, this kid took their advice and sought out other options for his life. He still played his axe, gigged with his band -- until several of the band memebers moved on. Two members went to music conservatories, one hooked up with a touring band and hit the road. Within two years the band more or less dissolved. Meanwhile, over the next 20 years, this kid (now an adult) bounced around exploring different career options, trying to figure it all out -- who he was and what he was supposed to do with his life. Throughout this time, he was off and on again with his guitar. Besides, he no longer had the time to devote to getting serious about playing guitar. All along he felt like something in his life was missing. Music -- the very thing that defined him, gave birth to his soul, his lifelong ambitions and dreams -- had been trampled, dismissed, dismantled and buried in a sea of self-doubt.

This kid....was me. In a few months I'll be 42 years old. Not a day in my life passes that I don't regret not following my dream. In spite of having two college degrees, a personally rewarding career that pays quite well, a wife, kids, two dogs, a cat, a koi pond, a nice home, etc. -- there is still an empty, unfilled void from a long lost dream.

Take a bit of advice from an old man -- don't EVER let anyone crush your goals and destroy your dreams. This doesn't mean you cannot listen to what other people have to say. There's always something to be learned, even if you think their ideas are a load of crap. You can always listen, smile, and say, "I appreciate your concern" -- then go grab your axe and rip off a few shreds to vent. The key is to know who you are, what you want, and have the self-discipline to dedicate yourself to it. The only difference between those that are great and those that linger in mediocrity is quite simple: the ones that make it to the top are the ones that are willing to work the hardest, sacrifice the most, and never stop striving toward their goals. In the end, you may or may not get exactly where you want to be -- but you can be assured you will achieve something great that you will always cherish.

One thing I must add here is that everything in life MUST have a balance. Sacrificing your education to jam on the guitar all day is definitely not going to enable you to reach your goals. Many, if not most, of the great guitarists -- those that we look to emulate and learn from here at GMC, are quite intelligent. Ever listen to these guys in an interview? By their musical talent it's quite clear they paid their dues and put forth the greatest of effort in their craft. However, in listening to their interviews it is also clear they have a broader knowledge base than that limited to grinding an axe or belting out bone-chilling vocals. Learn everything you can, from every experience, every day of your life and you will go far.

As for me, I may be an old man but I'm not that old. Through hard work, dedication, and the incredible learning experiences here at GMC, I'm going to get back to and beyond the performance-level player I used to be. I WILL get back on that stage! When the lights go down, and the amps crank up -- you can know one thing for sure....it's gonna freakin' ROCK!

Now, grab your guitar, tune up, crank it out, and never say die to your dreams! Peace! cool.gif

Dude...awesome post! biggrin.gif


--------------------
"Fact is, nothing in the world bores me more than gear...If I played thru your rig, I would still sound like me. Van Halen would sound like Van Halen. Brian May...etc. Very early in my career I decided to focus on creating music and not being a guitar tech. Being a good guitar tech is a very different and extremely difficult job, so why not leave it to a pro?"

Marty Friedman -

Guitars: ESP LTD viper-500, a fake strat and an acoustic guitar( dont know the brand)
Amp: Randall RX20R
Effects: Boss mt 2 distortion pedal, Line 6 pod floor plus
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FretDancer69
post Sep 3 2007, 01:44 AM
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QUOTE (Gen @ Sep 2 2007, 06:38 PM) *
Dude...awesome post! biggrin.gif



Indeed, those were some good words of wisdom and experience. Its stuff like that that makes me want to pursue my dreams, no matter who is against me. Thanks for taking your time telling us your story, NightFlight


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DeepRoots
post Sep 3 2007, 01:52 AM
Post #27


Get to da Chopper!
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That was an amazing post NightFlight
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KRmachine
post Sep 3 2007, 01:53 AM
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From age 15 I wanted to start playing guitar, but I never got around to it until i was 18 because I thought you had to basically start from birth to get anywhere, and that it was too late. I only started after I realized this was false, and I think it's important you realize this too, otherwise all your practicing will be hindered by those thoughts in the back of your head.
I must confess I get them from time to time myself when I see guys like Steve Vai or Buckethead, who were better than I'll ever be by the time they were my age (21). Then again, how many of those are there in the world? that's right, there's one of each and you don't have to be nearly as good as them to get somewhere.
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Ayen
post Sep 3 2007, 09:59 AM
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QUOTE (FretDancer69 @ Sep 3 2007, 12:23 AM) *
great words Ayen. I completely agree with you.



biggrin.gif I feel special.

QUOTE (NightFlight @ Sep 3 2007, 01:27 AM) *
This kid....was me.


Wow! What a twist, I never saw that coming. Reading your story really shows how much you love music, and how it hurt to let it go. I've personally (as I'm sure the rest of us have) had the dream of going on stage and playing lead guitar, but as time passes, and other things become available and seemingly more productive, things change. I was going to let this dream go to pursue a career in Video Game character concept design, full time. Now I've realized how much It'd hurt to see that dream pass by. Though I'll probably still work as a concept designer, I will never let music go.

I'll be waiting for you to come on stage. Thanks.


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FretDancer69
post Sep 3 2007, 10:27 AM
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QUOTE (Ayen @ Sep 3 2007, 02:59 AM) *
biggrin.gif I feel special.
Wow! What a twist, I never saw that coming.


yeah, it got me good too!! biggrin.gif


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The Uncreator
post Sep 3 2007, 10:43 AM
Post #31


Fire Up The Blades, Moderator
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NightFlight deserves a reward for that post!
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SLASH91
post Sep 3 2007, 11:09 AM
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QUOTE (The Uncreator @ Sep 3 2007, 04:43 AM) *
NightFlight deserves a reward for that post!


Amen, great post NightFlight. cool.gif

So, yeah ,Guitarman700, just screw what everyone says,and Pursue your dream. smile.gif


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Guitarman700
post Sep 3 2007, 11:59 AM
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QUOTE (NightFlight @ Sep 2 2007, 08:27 PM) *
There was this kid I knew a while back. At the age of 7, his mother bought him one of those little chord organs. Within a few months, this kid learned all the notes on the keyboard and could play everything in the songbooks -- in fact, he was pretty much reading music. By the time he was 10, he started learning wind instruments at school in beginning band. And that same year he got his first guitar and started learning from various beginner books. From then on, he played in school band (concert band, symphonic band, jazz band) until he graduated high school while still learning and playing guitar. Over the span of 8 years until graduation, this kid had learned clarinet, trumpet, sax, baritone, French horn, and was even writing entire scores for symphonic band during his senior year in high school. And yes, he was still jamming away at guitar. At age 17, he became a forming member of a local club band and played regular gigs. As high school graduation approached, he had a clear, concise vision of what he wanted to do with his life ---- he wanted to be a musician and a music teacher. It was the obvious choice since music was what he had known most of his life. Beside, his parents had more or less helped foster this passion from day one.

In quest of his dream, he proceeded to check out several U.S. colleges with well-known music programs. There were a few prospects, including Berkeley. But of course, someone had to slap him back into reality. His parents and other family members reminded him what a waste of time and life it would be to get a music degree -- this was not a respectable career, there was no money to be made in it, there are no jobs for people with music degrees....and so on.

Of course we all tend to trust our close family members, right? After all, those of us that have kids would like to think we are steering them in the right direction. So, this kid took their advice and sought out other options for his life. He still played his axe, gigged with his band -- until several of the band memebers moved on. Two members went to music conservatories, one hooked up with a touring band and hit the road. Within two years the band more or less dissolved. Meanwhile, over the next 20 years, this kid (now an adult) bounced around exploring different career options, trying to figure it all out -- who he was and what he was supposed to do with his life. Throughout this time, he was off and on again with his guitar. Besides, he no longer had the time to devote to getting serious about playing guitar. All along he felt like something in his life was missing. Music -- the very thing that defined him, gave birth to his soul, his lifelong ambitions and dreams -- had been trampled, dismissed, dismantled and buried in a sea of self-doubt.

This kid....was me. In a few months I'll be 42 years old. Not a day in my life passes that I don't regret not following my dream. In spite of having two college degrees, a personally rewarding career that pays quite well, a wife, kids, two dogs, a cat, a koi pond, a nice home, etc. -- there is still an empty, unfilled void from a long lost dream.

Take a bit of advice from an old man -- don't EVER let anyone crush your goals and destroy your dreams. This doesn't mean you cannot listen to what other people have to say. There's always something to be learned, even if you think their ideas are a load of crap. You can always listen, smile, and say, "I appreciate your concern" -- then go grab your axe and rip off a few shreds to vent. The key is to know who you are, what you want, and have the self-discipline to dedicate yourself to it. The only difference between those that are great and those that linger in mediocrity is quite simple: the ones that make it to the top are the ones that are willing to work the hardest, sacrifice the most, and never stop striving toward their goals. In the end, you may or may not get exactly where you want to be -- but you can be assured you will achieve something great that you will always cherish.

One thing I must add here is that everything in life MUST have a balance. Sacrificing your education to jam on the guitar all day is definitely not going to enable you to reach your goals. Many, if not most, of the great guitarists -- those that we look to emulate and learn from here at GMC, are quite intelligent. Ever listen to these guys in an interview? By their musical talent it's quite clear they paid their dues and put forth the greatest of effort in their craft. However, in listening to their interviews it is also clear they have a broader knowledge base than that limited to grinding an axe or belting out bone-chilling vocals. Learn everything you can, from every experience, every day of your life and you will go far.

As for me, I may be an old man but I'm not that old. Through hard work, dedication, and the incredible learning experiences here at GMC, I'm going to get back to and beyond the performance-level player I used to be. I WILL get back on that stage! When the lights go down, and the amps crank up -- you can know one thing for sure....it's gonna freakin' ROCK!

Now, grab your guitar, tune up, crank it out, and never say die to your dreams! Peace! cool.gif


That...was the most beautiful, inspiring thing ive heard in a long time. the mere fact that you took the time to tell your story to us make me feel better. i know what its like to lose a dream, i may only be 17, but ive had some pretty terrible things happen to me. music is my only passion, the only thing i have in my life. it keeps me sane, and makes me happy.Im NOT a "Normal" person, most of my life has been pretty messed up, but the mastering the guitar is my one and only dream. thanks to everybody for believing in me.


Colin


--------------------
My Gear:
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Fender Standard Stratocaster HSS
Jackson Dinky Custom
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Marshall MG10KK Kerry King 10 Watt
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Ayen
post Sep 3 2007, 12:10 PM
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We're always here for ya, buddy.


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FretDancer69
post Sep 3 2007, 12:47 PM
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QUOTE (Ayen @ Sep 3 2007, 05:10 AM) *
We're always here for ya, buddy.



yeah! we're all a family(wub.gif tongue.gif), so we're here to help each other! Now go and pursue your dream! wink.gif smile.gif


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Eat-Sleep-andJam
post Sep 3 2007, 02:11 PM
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QUOTE (NightFlight @ Sep 2 2007, 04:27 PM) *
There was this kid I knew a while back. At the age of 7, his mother bought him one of those little chord organs. Within a few months, this kid learned all the notes on the keyboard and could play everything in the songbooks -- in fact, he was pretty much reading music. By the time he was 10, he started learning wind instruments at school in beginning band. And that same year he got his first guitar and started learning from various beginner books. From then on, he played in school band (concert band, symphonic band, jazz band) until he graduated high school while still learning and playing guitar. Over the span of 8 years until graduation, this kid had learned clarinet, trumpet, sax, baritone, French horn, and was even writing entire scores for symphonic band during his senior year in high school. And yes, he was still jamming away at guitar. At age 17, he became a forming member of a local club band and played regular gigs. As high school graduation approached, he had a clear, concise vision of what he wanted to do with his life ---- he wanted to be a musician and a music teacher. It was the obvious choice since music was what he had known most of his life. Beside, his parents had more or less helped foster this passion from day one.

In quest of his dream, he proceeded to check out several U.S. colleges with well-known music programs. There were a few prospects, including Berkeley. But of course, someone had to slap him back into reality. His parents and other family members reminded him what a waste of time and life it would be to get a music degree -- this was not a respectable career, there was no money to be made in it, there are no jobs for people with music degrees....and so on.

Of course we all tend to trust our close family members, right? After all, those of us that have kids would like to think we are steering them in the right direction. So, this kid took their advice and sought out other options for his life. He still played his axe, gigged with his band -- until several of the band memebers moved on. Two members went to music conservatories, one hooked up with a touring band and hit the road. Within two years the band more or less dissolved. Meanwhile, over the next 20 years, this kid (now an adult) bounced around exploring different career options, trying to figure it all out -- who he was and what he was supposed to do with his life. Throughout this time, he was off and on again with his guitar. Besides, he no longer had the time to devote to getting serious about playing guitar. All along he felt like something in his life was missing. Music -- the very thing that defined him, gave birth to his soul, his lifelong ambitions and dreams -- had been trampled, dismissed, dismantled and buried in a sea of self-doubt.

This kid....was me. In a few months I'll be 42 years old. Not a day in my life passes that I don't regret not following my dream. In spite of having two college degrees, a personally rewarding career that pays quite well, a wife, kids, two dogs, a cat, a koi pond, a nice home, etc. -- there is still an empty, unfilled void from a long lost dream.

Take a bit of advice from an old man -- don't EVER let anyone crush your goals and destroy your dreams. This doesn't mean you cannot listen to what other people have to say. There's always something to be learned, even if you think their ideas are a load of crap. You can always listen, smile, and say, "I appreciate your concern" -- then go grab your axe and rip off a few shreds to vent. The key is to know who you are, what you want, and have the self-discipline to dedicate yourself to it. The only difference between those that are great and those that linger in mediocrity is quite simple: the ones that make it to the top are the ones that are willing to work the hardest, sacrifice the most, and never stop striving toward their goals. In the end, you may or may not get exactly where you want to be -- but you can be assured you will achieve something great that you will always cherish.

One thing I must add here is that everything in life MUST have a balance. Sacrificing your education to jam on the guitar all day is definitely not going to enable you to reach your goals. Many, if not most, of the great guitarists -- those that we look to emulate and learn from here at GMC, are quite intelligent. Ever listen to these guys in an interview? By their musical talent it's quite clear they paid their dues and put forth the greatest of effort in their craft. However, in listening to their interviews it is also clear they have a broader knowledge base than that limited to grinding an axe or belting out bone-chilling vocals. Learn everything you can, from every experience, every day of your life and you will go far.

As for me, I may be an old man but I'm not that old. Through hard work, dedication, and the incredible learning experiences here at GMC, I'm going to get back to and beyond the performance-level player I used to be. I WILL get back on that stage! When the lights go down, and the amps crank up -- you can know one thing for sure....it's gonna freakin' ROCK!

Now, grab your guitar, tune up, crank it out, and never say die to your dreams! Peace! cool.gif


Dude this by far the best post ive read on her in along time. I can honestly say I dont know what I wanna do with my life. I think about my dreams sometimes and I just wander off, Into a world that only I know. I just dont know what to love any more and what not. Its times like these when I pick up my guitar and try to escape all the bull**** of the world. You know I have a very brilliant Grandmother. She is the kindest most gentle person Ive ever meant and she is one of those old people who always has a story to tell. She often tells me about how when she was younger she would play the mandolin. And how she loved it and cheerished every minute of it. One day she came to found her brother sold her beloved mandolin. And that was that. Years passed and she grew old. She forgot about her mandolin. And well It was only yesterday that she found another one of her old ones in the attic. Its amazing to see the life rush into someone you love. Its kind of like waking up on Christmas morning and running down stairs before your whole family is up all you want to do is forget the world and enjoy life for that one brief moment .

I often stop and think where im going to be 20 years from now, me being 14. I just dont know. Id love to become a famous musican, and sell millions of records and have enough money to roll in . And after thats said and done Id donate some money to founding a program across america for the arts.

This may sound stupid but when im in school sometimes dazing off, I often think about my life as one big guitar journey. You first start off as junior guiar, you dont know your way around the frets yet but your learning. You eventually start to grow up and being a regular size guitar. You learn your way around and you know how and why the earth rotates the way it does. Years pass and you get older, your fretboard gets old and you to get older.Your finish begins to wear off , but you dont mind you just keep playing.

You guys may joke about it but I consider all of you family. Its not all the time that you come across great gentleman and ladies everyday ( Only switched Ladies and Gentlemen around because weve yet to actually get a steady population of women tongue.gif.)
Your all very good hearted people and I thank you for helping me learn to follow and purse my dreams, to become a professional musican.
- John


Edited for language - Andrew


This post has been edited by Andrew Cockburn: Sep 3 2007, 08:20 PM


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Ayen
post Sep 3 2007, 02:18 PM
Post #37


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My grandma just tells me the same story over and over again, but she doesn't know that :-\.

I consider GMC a family as well, we may not be as close as an actual family by definition, but we're always here for eachother, and thats something you dont find a lot. I'll be second to thank you guys, without GMC, I would still be a terrible guitarist, knowing little to nothing.


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Robin
post Sep 3 2007, 07:39 PM
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Amazing stories! biggrin.gif

This post has been edited by Robin: Sep 3 2007, 07:41 PM


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Francis Viviers
post Sep 3 2007, 08:15 PM
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QUOTE (Guitarman700 @ Sep 2 2007, 07:13 AM) *
My lifes dream is to be a pro guitarist, but lately everyone is telling me "you cant do it", "you started too late"(im 17 and just got rid of my bad practicing habits.) and "you cant make any money that way, youll never make it". i feel depressed and overwhelmed, What should i do? sad.gif sad.gif sad.gif


Dude! If you really want to you can become a great guitarist. I started a year and a half back. My mother told me we are not a musical family and that my guitar was just a waste of time and money. A year and a half down the line and im still going strong. Im nowhere near pro yet. But ill make it soon. Playing guitar is like breaking barriers. It becomes easier and easier the longer you play.

Chris also started at like 21 and he a kick ass guitarist. Having the determination to be great will drive you to be great. Use what others tell you to drive you where you want to go.

I recently discovered some nice ways of practicing and ill write a "newbie lesson" type page soon. Since i have been doing this, my playing speed has doubled in the last 3 months.

Good luck brother!
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edgor67
post Sep 3 2007, 09:00 PM
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GM 700, no doubt you saw NIGHTFLIGHT's post #24. Even though he is a whipper snapper at 42 his advice is sage. I'll be 53 in Oct and when I reflect on life it is mostly what ifs. In 1979 I sent my audition tape and $100. bucks to the Guitar Institute of Technology. They took me in. I was due to get out of the Navy and I was going to play guitar. Well... I met a girl, got my deposit back and went in another direction. She dumped me.

I went back in the Navy and retired 22 years later. Oh... I punched all the tickets. I have a lovely wife (not the former girlfriend , ofcourse) I'm doing ok (probably the best ever in my life) but I stopped playing guitar for 25 years. I always wonder where I would be if I followed my original plan. I think even a session guitarist would have been making it for me. We all know that it could propell a guitarist (e.g. Jimmie Page).

I have been playing guitar again since Nov; a GMC member since Feb. I want to shred! I have surpassed my level of playing and am continuing to go forward. Scales, Riffs, learning songs. I'm trying to catch up on 25 years of strings. I probably would be that session guitarist. Ya know what I think I want my third career to be just that. I'm not gonna let age stop me mentally or physically (arthritus s&^s). I recently met Larry Carlton and he pointed out that you never stop learning the guitar. The teacher is always the student.

Ya got to do what ya got to do. I recommend always have a plan B to keep the rent paid and gas in the car. (After all ya got to get to the gigs) Stay healty! Live good (exercise, and eat right). Play guitar.
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