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> Metronome Questions...please Help!
fatstrat
post Sep 5 2007, 02:15 AM
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So, I've been playing for about 2 and half years, thought I was pretty good, but just recently started using a metronome.... Is it normal to be off pace with the metronome and to start out at slow speeds in the beginning? I feel like a beginner all over again, but maybe thats a good thing. Any advice from anybody?


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steve25
post Sep 5 2007, 02:38 AM
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QUOTE (fatstrat @ Sep 5 2007, 02:15 AM) *
So, I've been playing for about 2 and half years, thought I was pretty good, but just recently started using a metronome.... Is it normal to be off pace with the metronome and to start out at slow speeds in the beginning? I feel like a beginner all over again, but maybe thats a good thing. Any advice from anybody?


Yes starting out slow when using a metronome is perfectly normal, in fact it's recommended. You see, with a metronome its main purpose is not so much making you a faster player although it will help with that too, it's about keeping you in time.

When you are comfortable with the pace you are going at gradually increase it and get comfortable with that. You will be able to keep up with the metronome at higher paces and stay in time before you know it. Hope this helps
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fatstrat
post Sep 5 2007, 02:46 AM
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QUOTE (steve25 @ Sep 4 2007, 09:38 PM) *
Yes starting out slow when using a metronome is perfectly normal, in fact it's recommended. You see, with a metronome its main purpose is not so much making you a faster player although it will help with that too, it's about keeping you in time.

When you are comfortable with the pace you are going at gradually increase it and get comfortable with that. You will be able to keep up with the metronome at higher paces and stay in time before you know it. Hope this helps



I appreciate the help alot! I just wanted to make sure that being off time when you're first starting out is normal with a metronome. I usually jam with a band and its not hard keeping in time with that, but this metronome's a whole other animal.


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Patrik81
post Sep 8 2007, 09:57 AM
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i'm also new to metronome so i'll ask a question in your thread if you don't mind, I've just learned 3 string arpeggio sweeps and do pretty well now but find it easier to play if i have double the speed on my metronome than what Pavel showed in a video here, I put metronome at 120 and play as if it was 60 in Pavels lesson. Is that wrong?
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Andrew Cockburn
post Sep 8 2007, 09:59 AM
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QUOTE (Patrik81 @ Sep 8 2007, 04:57 AM) *
i'm also new to metronome so i'll ask a question in your thread if you don't mind, I've just learned 3 string arpeggio sweeps and do pretty well now but find it easier to play if i have double the speed on my metronome than what Pavel showed in a video here, I put metronome at 120 and play as if it was 60 in Pavels lesson. Is that wrong?


Not wrong, its practically the same thing - you will get double the amount of clicks which will help you with the timing but that won't hurt. Maybe eventually try it at the true speed so you get used to playing with fewer rythmic cues.


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mattacuk
post Sep 9 2007, 06:02 PM
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If you feel you need a break from metronome clicks you can always practice to a backing track. A good example of this is Pavels Ionian scale lesson because you can tell by listening if your playing in time.

But for beginners a metronome is definatly a good idea to teach you good practice for the future.

This post has been edited by mattacuk: Sep 9 2007, 06:03 PM


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