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> Metal Scale
nickmarx12345678
post Nov 3 2007, 05:34 AM
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hey ive been trying to write some stuff kinda of in the style of like bullet for my valentine and dream theater but like the only scale i really know is the pentatonic minor and it doesnt sound right and i was wondering what would be a good scale to get that kinda of feel that they have if oyu know what im talking about
THANKS


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exorcyze
post Nov 3 2007, 06:03 AM
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Actually, Pentatonic Minor scale is an excellent first scale to work with. It is simple and expressive, and because of the notes in it, leaves less room for error than other scales for what it will work over. It works well for rock, blues, metal, fusion and jazz.

It's all about *how* you play the notes for it that really give it the flavor.

Other common scales used in metal style music are phrygian mode ( 3rd degree of the major scale, has a spanish flavor ), aeolian mode ( natural minor scale, good for expressing sorrow or pain ), diminished scale ( frequently used for jazz, but works well over power chords giving a gothic feel ), and harmonic minor scale ( frequently found in classical music ).

But again, I would suggest working with the pentatonic minor to start with. It is very expressive and easy to work with and can be used over most forms of music and common chord progressions. If you're having trouble getting it to sound like it fits in, then try working on some different phrasings, and maybe find some examples that you can try and emulate until you develop your own style with it. smile.gif


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Robin
post Nov 3 2007, 06:23 AM
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You should check out Wallimans Metal Head lesson!! As exorcyze said, its how you play the notes that matters. In Wallimans metal lesson he only use the pentatonic scale if I'm not mistaken, and it sounds freakin metal! I can only make the pentatonic scale sound bluesy though tongue.gif

But yeah, you need to learn to use the scale in the right way. For instance, you cant say "I know the pentatonic scale really well, now I can play blues". As exorcyze said, the pentatonic scale is used for jazz, blues, rock and metal(probably even more).


Edit: DAMNIT, sorry Pavel, I did not notice. Feel free to delete this sad.gif sorry.

This post has been edited by Robin: Nov 3 2007, 06:24 AM


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Pavel
post Nov 3 2007, 07:23 AM
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Robin: no probs man! smile.gif

Back on topic: you should work on minor and major scales, but not pentatonic, but regular ones. Also, type "riffing" in search and you'll see loads of riffing lessons covering all kinds of styles of metal, and not only riffs but also licks which are based on scales - especially the SPEEDRIFFING lessons by me, they have loads of licks to learn which you can later use for soloing.

Feel free to ask more! smile.gif


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