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> Down Tune Floyd Rose?
Iconoclast
post Nov 25 2007, 12:53 PM
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I play a JEM and I usually love the Floyd Rose. It never goes out of tune for me. But my only problem with it is that its soo hard to downtune. I can tune it normally, no problem, but I'm trying to get it to C F A# D# G C, and if anyone has any tips on going about doing it, I would really appreciate it. I'm actually seriously considering buying another guitar just for alternate tunings, but I don't have anywhere near the money right now.
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axelsson
post Nov 25 2007, 12:59 PM
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visit any nearby music store, I'm sure they'll help you! smile.gif
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botoxfox
post Nov 25 2007, 01:07 PM
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Use thicker strings and mess with the springs or buy a tremol-no...


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ZakkWylde
post Nov 25 2007, 02:15 PM
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This has nothing to do with thicker strings, you have to set up your whole guitar for that tuning. The springs that keep the tremolo floating must be untightened so that the bridge is floating at the right hight when you detuned it. When you know what youre doing,it takes you at least 1 to set up ypur guitar new for a lower tuning and you cant just go back to normal without setting it up for standard again. Quote Pavel: Once you set up your guitar right do never ever touch it again.
So if you want a diffrent tuning on a floyd rose guitar you'll have to keep it detuned or you'll have to buy another guitar. Like the others said take one without trem so you change tunings in a couple of minutes.


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The Uncreator
post Nov 25 2007, 02:15 PM
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Few steps that go into this.

1) Adjust any string size you wish to have (if needed, if you do, you will have to adjust the intonation more than likely)
2) Since your going a whole two steps down, just take all the strings out
3) put in the new strings and start tuning up to C, once you have done this, you will have to flip the guitar over to the back, and loosen the bridge springs quite a bit. Cause theres a 99% chance the bridge will not be properly aligned.
4) Keep adjusting the springs and retuning the strings, when you get all the strings relatively close to C Standard, lock the strings at the nut, and use the fine tuners to finish the job wink.gif

This post has been edited by The Uncreator: Nov 25 2007, 02:17 PM
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Pavel
post Nov 25 2007, 02:51 PM
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Getting another guitar is the best solution for this problem! If you usually play on standard tunings and actually learn lessons here which are all on standard tunings you should have 1 guitar at normal tuning and another one which you will tune as you like. Also if you like to change tunings often, i suggest you get a guitar without the tremolo.


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The Uncreator
post Nov 25 2007, 03:20 PM
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yeah i agree with Pavel, its best to invest in a mid-end guitar with a hardtail bridge or something, so you can change tunings often wink.gif
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Iconoclast
post Nov 25 2007, 03:55 PM
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Yeah, thanks.

I guess I could use my old beat up guitar for now whenever I use a different tuning.

I don't want to have to do all that stuff just to tune down. At least I don't tune down very often.
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dogman
post Nov 25 2007, 05:07 PM
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QUOTE (Pavel @ Nov 25 2007, 08:51 AM) *
Getting another guitar is the best solution for this problem! If you usually play on standard tunings and actually learn lessons here which are all on standard tunings you should have 1 guitar at normal tuning and another one which you will tune as you like. Also if you like to change tunings often, i suggest you get a guitar without the tremolo.


Pavel said it best.

But the biggest reason in suggesting another guitar is such drastic tunings make a huge difference in tension on the neck. Going from E or Eb down to D and/or C# will cause the neck to no longer stay straight.

Yes, you can adjust the bridge and spring tension on the floyd but that will not solve the problem when you can slide one of your fingers under the strings next week ohmy.gif because the neck has to be adjusted to the tension of any particular tuning you are using.

I only play in 3 (E, Eb and drop D) tunings so I have 3 guitars set up and tuned accordingly and I leave them that way. I also have 3 backs ups to play out set up the same way just in case.

It's never good to switch between tunings. Not even the half steps of E and Eb.

Have you ever noticed that after while of playing you dont get those harmonics as easily, the action is a little higher or the notes dont sing as long?

I am not saying it's just because you change tunings when you try to learn new songs and play different stuff, but it doesnt help and you will probably need a new set up more frequently than if you didnt.

Just my 2cents wink.gif
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