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> Noise Reduction?
CheeseBeard
post Dec 1 2007, 10:04 PM
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Hi all,

Just wondering if anyone has any tips/advice on how to reduce unwanted noise (such as strings hitting frets, releasing bends etc) when playing solos in particular. I've been practising some of the slower GnR's solos recently and can get them to sound ok apart from this dry.gif.

Also, when I play slightly faster solos on the higher frets, I sometimes get a weird booming sound coming from my amp. Anyone have ideas on how to stop this as well?

Thanks for any help
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Pavel
post Dec 1 2007, 10:27 PM
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First of all, it will come with time. It has a lot to do with being precise (not hitting wrong frets and not hitting the strings around) and also right hand muting.


I didn't quite understand the "booming" sound? Any details?


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CheeseBeard
post Dec 1 2007, 10:59 PM
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Thanks for the reply...guess i will just need to keep practising then smile.gif.

I'm not very good at explaining things but i'll give it a try. The booming only happens when i'm playing with distortion or a lot of gain and usually happens around frets 14-17 on strings 1 and 2 particularly. When it does happen, the note that is played sounds out of tune and louder than the rest. If it helps at all, i get it a lot when playing the notes on the first string in the Sweet Child of Mine intro, especially on the 14th fret.

Sorry if that made no sense at all tongue.gif.

Thanks again
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Pavel
post Dec 1 2007, 11:22 PM
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That's really strange...i guess it has something to do with the strings setup (too low or too high). Maybe somebody else here had experienced some similar problems and might be of help.


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David.C.Bond
post Dec 2 2007, 12:33 AM
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As Pavel said, it comes with practice, but try playing exercises really (really) slowly and try to pinpoint where the noise is coming from, then work out ways to avoid the noise.
Also, try to get hold of some Stylus Pick plectrums, they are designed to help economise your picking strokes which could help to eliminate unwanted noise.
Hope that helps!


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Ivan Milenkovic
post Dec 2 2007, 06:09 PM
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Work more on your right and left hand muting technique. Apply these mutings in EVERY exercise you do as they are crusial in developing your sound.


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AdamB
post Dec 4 2007, 10:21 AM
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Does the booming happen on all amps you play your guitar through?

If your amp has a reverb tank (spring reverb) then that can sometimes be the cause of booming and feedback problems. The metallic springs inside the tank have a resonant frequency in the higher registers and can start to vibrate crazily at certain notes. This is usually fixed by dampening the springs but some cheaper amps don't have this dampening and it can be a problem. If have a spring reverb, it still may be engaged in the signal chain even if you turn it down/off, as it may just be muting the input to the spring tank and not the output.

If you do have a spring reverb and suspect it may be the cause you can place foam inside the spring tank between the springs and the outside of the spring tank to stop the feedback and booming noises, however your reverb will not function correctly whilst the foam is in place.
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