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Phil66
Nicolas Wright, a first violinist with the London Symphony, shares his thoughts on how much practice is enough, and how to structure your practice time to get the most out of it without exhausting yourself physically or mentally. He also discusses ways an instructor might approach working with a student to develop his or her musical potential.

I'm not saying our instructors need any advice but we may have students on here who are instructors too and this may help them smile.gif It is also good for us students to listen to wink.gif

Todd Simpson
Very cool interview, thanks for sharing!
Gabriel Leopardi
I agree with everything he says. Great speech. Thanks for sharing.
nikeman64
Great vid! In 4:45 Nicolas gives a super summary of key elements. He says A LOT with verry few words.
Thanks for sharing Phill smile.gif
PosterBoy
No new information, the same things you'll hear from all other accomplished musicians

Yet we still look for short cuts and magic bullets instead of focusing and putting the work in! tongue.gif

One day it will sink in!!!!

Thanks for sharing, I may play it every day just to remind me and put myself in the right mindset.
Phil66
Yeah I know it's the same but I posted it for exactly the reason you said; mindset. I think it's good to have these thing pop up regularly because that mindset can slowly fade and things like this rekindle it smile.gif
Plus, and I don't know why, it seems to have a more profound effect when it is someone like him from something like The London Symphony. Maybe sometime will enlighten us on the psychology.
Cheers.
Phil66
Just thought I'd bump this. I found it whilst looking for another post from way back when. Hopefully some new members will get something from it wink.gif
Todd Simpson
Great advice from this guy smile.gif I agree all the way. Consistency is the key. Half an hour a day is better than 2 hours every few days. The brain needs time to absorb things while new neural pathways form. Just keeping at it in a consistent way and doing quality practice is really the key. It sounds simple, but in actuality it's a bit harder than it sounds. Still, if it was easy, everyone would be a great player! That's what makes playing an instrument so special imho. Nobody can fake/cheat/buy/inherit it. YOu gotta earn it. One day at a time. If you do earn it, other players can hear it right away.


Todd
QUOTE (Phil66 @ Aug 31 2018, 02:58 PM) *
Just thought I'd bump this. I found it whilst looking for another post from way back when. Hopefully some new members will get something from it wink.gif
PosterBoy
Last year (I think it was) I took this free online course.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/learning-how-to-learn

I found it quite motivational in term of understanding how we learn and why we need to practice in the ways we are told to. Hearing the science behind it all gave me an extra push to make the effort
Phil66
Just a bump here for newcomers wink.gif
Todd Simpson
Everyone new to becoming a musician should have to watch this at least once when they buy their first guitar/bass/etc. smile.gif Like you say, it has a lot of gravity coming from the first violin of the london orchestra. Of course, it's the same stuff that the instructors here have been saying for the past 10 years, but sometimes it takes the guy from the lond orchestra to get it to stick smile.gif


Phil66
Yeah, that's why I reposted Todd, so that newcomers can see it.

An interesting point he says is that when warming up "you have to get your hearing going", people always think that "hearing is hearing". I thought that until I started ear trading with the Perfect Ear app. Some days, when work has been hard and I'm tired, my scores are much lower until I get my hearing going wink.gif

I'm wondering if we could have an area where videos like this are held. Admin could decide which ones are allowed so that it doesn't become a big jumble of videos. Just a select few where an instructor could say, "Watch this video, he's the lead violinist for the London Symphony Orchestra so he knows what he's on about." or "Watch this Paul Gilbert video.................".

It just needs a few select videos that aren't very long, unless the instructor links with a timeline. I should be freely accessible for viewing too, maybe called "Recommending viewing".

Rock on.

Cheers

Phil
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