Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Electro-classical Guitar
GMC Forum > Discussion Boards > GEAR & PRODUCTION
Adam
Hello GMC! I've come across an electro-classicar guitar that is LP-shaped but uses nylon strings and apparently a mic. I already have a classical guitar but mine has no cutaway and recording it requires me to be close to the phone to capture the mic. I'm not saying I'll get it or anything but does anybody use this kind of guitar here? If so, could you share your thoughts?

The one I found is Cort Sunset NY BK, mahogany top and neck with rosewood fingerboard. I know Cort doesn't make brilliant electric guitars in the lower price range but maybe the Sunset series is a bit more appealing.
Mertay
These guitars are mostly bought cause of stage concerns rather than tone. Both acoustic or classic, they're good at preventing feedback on stage.

They aren't super bad for their tone but to me doesn't get much better than "usable" (no depth, dimension or sweetness when compared to a regular design, expect a very upfront sound). I didn't play high quality ones though, a better mic. on such guitars can make a noticeable difference.

Side note; I'm not a fan of cutaways either on regular designs. Personal opinion but to me they steal too much of the tone and lower areas usually aren't played much on the fret-board to make it worth the compromise.
Todd Simpson
Handy for recording as it has a pickup built in smile.gif But not great if you want to actually buy/play classical guitar without having to plug it in. Give it a whirl if you can smile.gif

QUOTE (Adam @ Sep 20 2019, 04:55 AM) *
Hello GMC! I've come across an electro-classicar guitar that is LP-shaped but uses nylon strings and apparently a mic. I already have a classical guitar but mine has no cutaway and recording it requires me to be close to the phone to capture the mic. I'm not saying I'll get it or anything but does anybody use this kind of guitar here? If so, could you share your thoughts?

The one I found is Cort Sunset NY BK, mahogany top and neck with rosewood fingerboard. I know Cort doesn't make brilliant electric guitars in the lower price range but maybe the Sunset series is a bit more appealing.
klasaine
The solid body nylon string guitars usually sound pretty bad. Very artificial.
There are a lot of really good sounding standard classical guitars (some with cutaways) with pickups built in that sound great. Yamaha and Takamine have many models at all price ranges.

*The only solid body classical that was decent was the Gibson 'Chet Atkins' model. As Mertay mentioned, the solid design is about minimizing feedback on louder stages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_Chet_Atkins_SST
Sensible Jones
I haven't used that particular model but I used to use a friends Gibson Chet Atkins Slimline Nylon Acoustic on occasion, not the greatest sounding thing 'unplugged' but not a bad sound when amplified (preferably Direct into the PA).
PosterBoy
When I was looking into getting one, the Cordoba brand seemed to be a good compromise on quality and price.
Adam
QUOTE (Mertay @ Sep 20 2019, 10:52 AM) *
These guitars are mostly bought cause of stage concerns rather than tone. Both acoustic or classic, they're good at preventing feedback on stage.

They aren't super bad for their tone but to me doesn't get much better than "usable" (no depth, dimension or sweetness when compared to a regular design, expect a very upfront sound). I didn't play high quality ones though, a better mic. on such guitars can make a noticeable difference.

Side note; I'm not a fan of cutaways either on regular designs. Personal opinion but to me they steal too much of the tone and lower areas usually aren't played much on the fret-board to make it worth the compromise.

I already have a Classical guitar and it rocks but it has no cutaway and playing stuff like Dee, Black Star or To Live Is To Die is just impossible when I can practically use only 12 of 19 frets.

QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 20 2019, 11:47 AM) *
Handy for recording as it has a pickup built in smile.gif But not great if you want to actually buy/play classical guitar without having to plug it in. Give it a whirl if you can smile.gif

I meant it specifically for recording or performing in front of my family, later maybe I'll get bigger audiences smile.gif Solid body could actually be useful to practice at late hours because it's significantly more quiet. I'll make sure to test a few before the purchase. It's quite new stuff for me and I want to get some idea of what I'm looking for.

QUOTE (klasaine @ Sep 20 2019, 02:51 PM) *
The solid body nylon string guitars usually sound pretty bad. Very artificial.
There are a lot of really good sounding standard classical guitars (some with cutaways) with pickups built in that sound great. Yamaha and Takamine have many models at all price ranges.

*The only solid body classical that was decent was the Gibson 'Chet Atkins' model. As Mertay mentioned, the solid design is about minimizing feedback on louder stages.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_Chet_Atkins_SST

If the "artificial" tone sounds anything like YJM's Classical tone, then it's an advantage not a disadvantage for me, I'm the type who prefers alu picks over Delrin, Ultex or Tortex, so anything is possible smile.gif I'm looking for a solid body design specifically.

QUOTE (Sensible Jones @ Sep 20 2019, 05:24 PM) *
I haven't used that particular model but I used to use a friends Gibson Chet Atkins Slimline Nylon Acoustic on occasion, not the greatest sounding thing 'unplugged' but not a bad sound when amplified (preferably Direct into the PA).

I'm not sure if I can afford a Gibson but I'll give it a try if I get the chance! Thanks for the heads up!

QUOTE (PosterBoy @ Sep 23 2019, 08:09 AM) *
When I was looking into getting one, the Cordoba brand seemed to be a good compromise on quality and price.

I'll check theirs but in the online catalogue of my GC there isn't any.
Todd Simpson
I've owned several classical guitars with electronics in them and my fave of all of them was the Yamaha that I had. I had several Yamaha classicals with the electronics package built in that had the guitar jack, on board EQ, 9 volt battery port, etc. They were the best of all of the ones that I owned. I studied classical guitar in college and I ran through a ton of cheap classical guitars with electronic on board. the sweet spot seemed to be the yamahas. Like this guy for I got used about $300. I've seen them as low as $150for older models. Every single one had good resonance and sounded good without being plugged in. All of the others in the range, from every other builder sounded a bit dead.
https://amzn.to/2kYGkBj
Click to view attachment
Sensible Jones
QUOTE (Adam @ Sep 23 2019, 05:41 PM) *
I'm not sure if I can afford a Gibson but I'll give it a try if I get the chance! Thanks for the heads up!

If you do find one definitely give it a try!! You'll find used Gibson ones for around £1000, there was also an Epiphone version which should be about £500.
As Todd mentioned the Yamaha range are very good value for money!!
biggrin.gif
Adam
QUOTE (Todd Simpson @ Sep 24 2019, 02:37 AM) *
I've owned several classical guitars with electronics in them and my fave of all of them was the Yamaha that I had. I had several Yamaha classicals with the electronics package built in that had the guitar jack, on board EQ, 9 volt battery port, etc. They were the best of all of the ones that I owned. I studied classical guitar in college and I ran through a ton of cheap classical guitars with electronic on board. the sweet spot seemed to be the yamahas. Like this guy for I got used about $300. I've seen them as low as $150for older models. Every single one had good resonance and sounded good without being plugged in. All of the others in the range, from every other builder sounded a bit dead.
https://amzn.to/2kYGkBj
Click to view attachment

I've had some bad experience with Yamaha but I'll give it a try. I'm looking for a solid body guitar but you never know what you end up buying. I had my eyes set one a car but I accidentally found a better deal and got that one instead, same could work with a guitar smile.gif

QUOTE (Sensible Jones @ Sep 24 2019, 10:48 AM) *
If you do find one definitely give it a try!! You'll find used Gibson ones for around £1000, there was also an Epiphone version which should be about £500.
As Todd mentioned the Yamaha range are very good value for money!!
biggrin.gif

Both are more than I can afford but trying it out is always nice! biggrin.gif Maybe I'll pay more attention to Yamaha, as it seems to have good reputation here.
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2019 Invision Power Services, Inc.