Blues: Beyond The Minor Pentatonic

by Jacob Light

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  • Hey Folks!

    Welcome to "Blues: Beyond The Minor Pentatonic". In this lesson we're going to combine two different scales - the minor pentatonic and the major pentatonic, to create a classic blues sounding lead line. We're also going to look beyond "just" combining these scales, and talk about the chord shapes and tones that reside within these shapes.

    Another very important concept we are going to cover (or at least introduce) is being ambiguous when it comes to the identity of the scale/chord - Major/Minor. You'll see a lot of going back and forth between C and C#, which are respectfully the minor and major 3rd's of A. When you finally get used to seamlessly use both in your playing, you'll be in the right path to being a true blues player ;)

    Please feel free to ask any questions you may have in the comment section, and I'll be more than happy to help.

    Enjoy :)


    Key: A

    Chords: A7, D7, E7

    Chord Progression:
    (12 bar blues with a "quick change" or a "quick IV")

    | I | IV | I | I | IV | IV |
    | I | I | V | IV | I | V |

    Tempo: 110

    Time Signature: 12/8

    Tuning: Standard

    Gear Used:

    Lead Guitar: 1987 Gibson Les Paul Standard
    Rhythm Guitar: Fender AVRI '52 Telecaster
    Amp: Fender Tweed Deluxe (1x12) Limited Edition
    Overdrive: Xotic Effects AC Booster
    Mics: Shure SM57 and Rode NTK (slightly off-axis)
    Preamps: Presonus TubePre x2
    DAW: Avid Pro Tools 11

    Scale Shapes:

    Am Blues (Am Pentatonic + "Blue Note")

    A Pentatonic

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