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Nihilist1
post Sep 24 2011, 04:53 AM
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I started all over again after watching Ben's AP video that he posted not long ago. I have to admit, it sucks dry.gif . After playing for five years, it is quite a pain in the ass. I have far better control of my right hand now( Thanks Ben!), my playing is cleaner than ever before; and I figured that I would restart my left hand as well so that I could play closer to the fretboard. My only question, is how do I get my left hand to stay close to the fretboard while I am using legato techniques? I can keep my fingers roughly a mm or two above the strings( I have just enough clearance so that they don't touch the string when it is being played), but when it comes to legato, I feel quite hopeless. Any tips?

Also, I have started bending from the wrist, rather than the fingers.


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Ben Higgins
post Sep 24 2011, 09:38 AM
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Hi Duder ! I'm really please my AP videos have helped you - we all struggle with that infernal technique ! dry.gif

Well, I went through a period of trying to keep my fingers closer to the neck but after a while I realised it's note really something you have to strive for.. if you practice legato or any kind of solos or exercises that require you to travel over the neck using 3 note per string shapes etc than you will gradually just form the technique that you need. My fingers are not that close to the strings really.. it may look it when they're going quickly, but that's probably because they're going quickly wink.gif

More than anything, what I would stress as important is 2 things.. hand position and lightness of touch.

For hand position, anything between the classical parallel position or just slightly offset from the classical position is the most efficient for playing legato shapes. Above the 12th fret, when you climb a bit higher you might find that you need an angled approach to play certain shapes (especially when standing up). If you are playing 3 note per string shapes on lower strings, like E, A & D then ou might also need to adopt a more angled approach from about the 10th fret and above when standing up as well.

Lightness of touch - I recently spent some time making my legato technique a bit more efficient because I was wearing my hands out too quickly. What I found was that using a very light touch (and I mean ridiculously light, just enough so that the notes sound with a distorted tone) was more efficient for learning shapes or sequences. If you don't try to force your fingers into certain position you will naturally let tham find their own way and you'll be faster as a result. Once you've got the shapes in your muscle memory and they're no problem for you to play then you can begin to add a little more pressure from your fingertips. This is where the extra tone comes in. Think light and your fingers will reflect that.

So, in short.. when I'm practising legato I keep it ultra light. When I'm recording or performing I put more 'juice' into it smile.gif

I hope that helps !

This post has been edited by Ben Higgins: Sep 24 2011, 09:40 AM


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Cosmin Lupu
post Sep 25 2011, 11:55 AM
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Awesome advice from the Legato master himself! wink.gif

QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 24 2011, 08:38 AM) *
Hi Duder ! I'm really please my AP videos have helped you - we all struggle with that infernal technique ! dry.gif

Well, I went through a period of trying to keep my fingers closer to the neck but after a while I realised it's note really something you have to strive for.. if you practice legato or any kind of solos or exercises that require you to travel over the neck using 3 note per string shapes etc than you will gradually just form the technique that you need. My fingers are not that close to the strings really.. it may look it when they're going quickly, but that's probably because they're going quickly wink.gif

More than anything, what I would stress as important is 2 things.. hand position and lightness of touch.

For hand position, anything between the classical parallel position or just slightly offset from the classical position is the most efficient for playing legato shapes. Above the 12th fret, when you climb a bit higher you might find that you need an angled approach to play certain shapes (especially when standing up). If you are playing 3 note per string shapes on lower strings, like E, A & D then ou might also need to adopt a more angled approach from about the 10th fret and above when standing up as well.

Lightness of touch - I recently spent some time making my legato technique a bit more efficient because I was wearing my hands out too quickly. What I found was that using a very light touch (and I mean ridiculously light, just enough so that the notes sound with a distorted tone) was more efficient for learning shapes or sequences. If you don't try to force your fingers into certain position you will naturally let tham find their own way and you'll be faster as a result. Once you've got the shapes in your muscle memory and they're no problem for you to play then you can begin to add a little more pressure from your fingertips. This is where the extra tone comes in. Think light and your fingers will reflect that.

So, in short.. when I'm practising legato I keep it ultra light. When I'm recording or performing I put more 'juice' into it smile.gif

I hope that helps !



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Nihilist1
post Sep 25 2011, 10:03 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 24 2011, 08:38 AM) *
Hi Duder ! I'm really please my AP videos have helped you - we all struggle with that infernal technique ! dry.gif

Well, I went through a period of trying to keep my fingers closer to the neck but after a while I realised it's note really something you have to strive for.. if you practice legato or any kind of solos or exercises that require you to travel over the neck using 3 note per string shapes etc than you will gradually just form the technique that you need. My fingers are not that close to the strings really.. it may look it when they're going quickly, but that's probably because they're going quickly wink.gif

More than anything, what I would stress as important is 2 things.. hand position and lightness of touch.

For hand position, anything between the classical parallel position or just slightly offset from the classical position is the most efficient for playing legato shapes. Above the 12th fret, when you climb a bit higher you might find that you need an angled approach to play certain shapes (especially when standing up). If you are playing 3 note per string shapes on lower strings, like E, A & D then ou might also need to adopt a more angled approach from about the 10th fret and above when standing up as well.

Lightness of touch - I recently spent some time making my legato technique a bit more efficient because I was wearing my hands out too quickly. What I found was that using a very light touch (and I mean ridiculously light, just enough so that the notes sound with a distorted tone) was more efficient for learning shapes or sequences. If you don't try to force your fingers into certain position you will naturally let tham find their own way and you'll be faster as a result. Once you've got the shapes in your muscle memory and they're no problem for you to play then you can begin to add a little more pressure from your fingertips. This is where the extra tone comes in. Think light and your fingers will reflect that.

So, in short.. when I'm practising legato I keep it ultra light. When I'm recording or performing I put more 'juice' into it smile.gif

I hope that helps !


Thanks! I will definitely practice both of these things from now on as well! biggrin.gif


--------------------
All the elders have fallen down...

Heal her now...

All the elders have fallen down...

Heal her now...

Grandfather elk
Turned to me
And spoke:

Light the fire deep inside.
Light the fires!

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Sinisa Cekic
post Sep 25 2011, 10:43 PM
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QUOTE (Ben Higgins @ Sep 24 2011, 10:38 AM) *
Hi Duder ! I'm really please my AP videos have helped you - we all struggle with that infernal technique ! dry.gif

Well, I went through a period of trying to keep my fingers closer to the neck but after a while I realised it's note really something you have to strive for.. if you practice legato or any kind of solos or exercises that require you to travel over the neck using 3 note per string shapes etc than you will gradually just form the technique that you need. My fingers are not that close to the strings really.. it may look it when they're going quickly, but that's probably because they're going quickly wink.gif

More than anything, what I would stress as important is 2 things.. hand position and lightness of touch.

For hand position, anything between the classical parallel position or just slightly offset from the classical position is the most efficient for playing legato shapes. Above the 12th fret, when you climb a bit higher you might find that you need an angled approach to play certain shapes (especially when standing up). If you are playing 3 note per string shapes on lower strings, like E, A & D then ou might also need to adopt a more angled approach from about the 10th fret and above when standing up as well.

Lightness of touch - I recently spent some time making my legato technique a bit more efficient because I was wearing my hands out too quickly. What I found was that using a very light touch (and I mean ridiculously light, just enough so that the notes sound with a distorted tone) was more efficient for learning shapes or sequences. If you don't try to force your fingers into certain position you will naturally let tham find their own way and you'll be faster as a result. Once you've got the shapes in your muscle memory and they're no problem for you to play then you can begin to add a little more pressure from your fingertips. This is where the extra tone comes in. Think light and your fingers will reflect that.

So, in short.. when I'm practising legato I keep it ultra light. When I'm recording or performing I put more 'juice' into it smile.gif

I hope that helps !



It seems that I need that Skype lesson, Ben biggrin.gif !


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Ben Higgins
post Sep 26 2011, 08:41 AM
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QUOTE (Sinisa Cekic @ Sep 25 2011, 10:43 PM) *
It seems that I need that Skype lesson, Ben biggrin.gif !


Ha ! I think it is me who needs the lesson from you, sir ! cool.gif


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